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  • Title : Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond

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  • Number of Pages: 418 pages


Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond Description

From Harvard sociologist and MacArthur Genius Matthew Desmond, a landmark work of scholarship and reportage that will forever change the way we look at poverty in America In this brilliant, heartbreaking book, Matthew Desmond takes us into the poorest neighborhoods of Milwaukee to tell the story of eight families on the edge Arleen is a single mother trying to raise her From Harvard sociologist and MacArthur Genius Matthew Desmond, a landmark work of scholarship and reportage that will forever change the way we look at poverty in America In this brilliant, heartbreaking book, Matthew Desmond takes us into the poorest neighborhoods of Milwaukee to tell the story of eight families on the edge Arleen is a single mother trying to raise her two sons on the 20 a month she has left after paying for their rundown apartment Scott is a gentle nurse consumed by a heroin addiction Lamar, a man with no legs and a neighborhood full of boys to look after, tries to work his way out of debt Vanetta participates in a botched stickup after her hours are cut All are spending almost everything they have on rent, and all have fallen behind The fates of these families are in the hands of two landlords Sherrena Tarver, a former schoolteacher turned inner city entrepreneur, and Tobin Charney, who runs one of the worst trailer parks in Milwaukee They loathe some of their tenants and are fond of others, but as Sherrena puts it, Love don t pay the bills She moves to evict Arleen and her boys a few days before Christmas Even in the most desolate areas of American cities, evictions used to be rare But today, most poor renting families are spending than half of their income on housing, and eviction has become ordinary, especially for single mothers In vivid, intimate prose, Desmond provides a ground level view of one of the most urgent issues facing America today As we see families forced into shelters, squalid apartments, or dangerous neighborhoods, we bear witness to the human cost of America s vast inequality and to people s determination and intelligence in the face of hardship Based on years of embedded fieldwork and painstakingly gathered data, this masterful book transforms our understanding of extreme poverty and economic exploitation while providing fresh ideas for solving a devastating, uniquely American problem Its unforgettable scenes of hope and loss remind us of the centrality of home, without which nothing else is possible Get A CopyKindle Store Online StoresAudibleBarnes NobleKoboApple iBooksGoogle PlayAbebooksBook DepositoryIndigoAlibrisBetter World BooksIndieBoundLibraries Or buy for Hardcover, 418 pages Published March 1st 2016 by Crown More Details Original Title Evicted Poverty and Profit in the American City ISBN 0553447432 ISBN13 9780553447439 Edition Language English setting Milwaukee, Wisconsin United States Literary Awards Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction 2017 , PEN John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction 2017 , Los Angeles Times Book Prize Nominee for Current Interest 2016 , National Book Critics Circle Award for General Nonfiction 2016 , Andrew Carnegie Medal for Nonfiction 2017 Goodreads Choice Award Nominee for Nonfiction 2016 less Other Editions 15 All Editions Add a New Edition Combine Less Detail edit details Friend Reviews To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up Reader QA To ask other readers questions about Evicted, please sign up Popular Answered Questions Does this book read anything like Desmonds incredibly f ing good New Yorker piece 6 likeslike one year ago See all 4 answers Eli Mandel Yes I picked up the book because of that excerpt, it s that, and so much and so much better flag Does this book make you cry 10 likeslike one year ago See all 7 answers Heather Yes It s a detailed picture of individual and systemic failure The filthy and dangerous conditions are horrifying The catch 22 of arrears, fines, Yes It s a detailed picture of individual and systemic failure The filthy and dangerous conditions are horrifying The catch 22 of arrears, fines, penalties, and debts make my head hurt As with credit card debt and fines for driving misdemeanors, it s expensive to be poor penalties for late payment and partial payment pile up The sheer number and variety of damaged, broken, addicted people struggling to survive makes my heart hurt The predatory behavior of the slumlords makes me angry, even while I sympathize with their desire not to be taken advantage of, cheated and ripped off The self destructive behavior of the tenants also makes me angry and baffled, even while I sympathize with their desire to indulge a little short term comfort or rebellion in their rotten circumstances This book exposes the rental market for poor, uneducated, addicted, disabled people as predatory less flag See all 11 questions about Evicted Lists with This Book Best Books of 2016 1,273 books 2,338 voters New York Times 100 Notable Books of 2016 102 books 81 voters More lists with this book Community Reviews showing 1 30 Rating details Sort Default Filter Apr 22, 2016 Jennifer Masterson rated it it was amazing Shelves audio, non fiction This just won The Pulitzer Yay Evicted Poverty and Profit in the American City is probably the most important book that I have ever read If you are to read one non fiction book this year it should probably be this book This should be required reading in high school I learned about poverty and poor renters, the eviction process, and scumbag landlords.This book is about 8 families in Milwaukee These are both Caucasian and African American families The book is broken down into 3 parts This just won The Pulitzer Yay Evicted Poverty and Profit in the American City is probably the most important book that I have ever read If you are to read one non fiction book this year it should probably be this book This should be required reading in high school I learned about poverty and poor renters, the eviction process, and scumbag landlords.This book is about 8 families in Milwaukee These are both Caucasian and African American families The book is broken down into 3 parts They are real life stories These stories are so unbelievable that they read like fiction I cannot do this book justice The reason I read it was because of my friend Shelby She wrote a phenomenal review Here it is Please check it out Many of these families were spending up to 80 percent of their income just on rent This left little money for anything else The system was meant for families to spend up to 30 percent of their income on rent It s truly unbelievable and eye opening I listened to the audio version I would say the narration is about 4 Stars I wish there were two narrators instead of one The different voices all started sounding the same after awhile In all fairness, this is a tough book for a narrator to tackle and when he was telling the story and not doing the individual voices he did a great job The one character I identified with the most was Scott I think it s because he made me realize this could happen to me Scott was making 80k a year as a nurse at one point but became addicted to pain killers and then his life spirals down from there into harder drugs and homelessness Although there is hope for him, I m not giving spoilers so you are going to have to read the book to find out what happens to him His story made me realize this could happen to anybody Even if you have never been part of the welfare system you can still end up homeless.This is not a happy book but it is a very important one The author is Sociologist, Matthew Desmond, and he is an amazing person, too Please read this book and tell your friends about it There needs to be changes made to the welfare system in the United States People should not be living in filth and squalor like this with little chance of moving up Children should not be shuffled around from school to school, either The author suggests a universal housing voucher program made cost efficient We need change in the United States and we need it now flag 216 likesLike see review View all 84 comments Dec 03, 2016 Roxane rated it it was amazing The brutal truth of poverty in America is far devastating than any fiction ever could be In evicted, Matthew Desmond brings rigorous sociological research and ethnography to Milwaukee s inner city This book is painful and necessary and eye opening I am ashamed of how little I knew about poverty and eviction This book is fucking depressing and hopeless and excellent We have got to do better Also the segregation And racist ass Ned who made his biracial stepdaughters say white power w The brutal truth of poverty in America is far devastating than any fiction ever could be In evicted, Matthew Desmond brings rigorous sociological research and ethnography to Milwaukee s inner city This book is painful and necessary and eye opening I am ashamed of how little I knew about poverty and eviction This book is fucking depressing and hopeless and excellent We have got to do better Also the segregation And racist ass Ned who made his biracial stepdaughters say white power while their mom hoped it wouldn t scar them What flag 176 likesLike see review View all 8 comments May 10, 2016 Stephanie rated it it was amazing Shelves finished 2016, 2016 pub, non fiction, netgalley, grcac 2017 5 stars Eye opening and heartbreaking account of the plight of renters living below the poverty line Evicted Poverty and Profit in the American City is a heartbreaking sociological account of the current housing crisis in the U.S for low income renters It is well written and focuses on first hand accounts and the Author s observations of and interactions with both tenants and landlords Matthew Desmond spent months performing fieldwork including living in both a trailer park and a ro 5 stars Eye opening and heartbreaking account of the plight of renters living below the poverty line Evicted Poverty and Profit in the American City is a heartbreaking sociological account of the current housing crisis in the U.S for low income renters It is well written and focuses on first hand accounts and the Author s observations of and interactions with both tenants and landlords Matthew Desmond spent months performing fieldwork including living in both a trailer park and a rooming house in the city of Milwaukee The focus is on circumstances of 8 different evictees The depiction of each story is sad, engrossing, and colorful such that this feels almost like reading fiction The horror is that these are true stories Desmond did extensive research and fieldwork, beyond the individuals featured in the book The author describes how the fieldwork impacted him the work was heartbreaking and left me depressed for years. I learned to suppress my shock at traumatic things I learned to tell a real crisis from mere poverty Shocking facts learned How easy it is for a landlord to evict a tenant General consensus is that no than 30% of income should go to housing for the poor rent may be much closer to 100% of income Landlords don t want to rent to families or a parent with children it is difficult for single mothers, or even families to find an affordable rental Tenants often do work for the landlords to pay back rent and landlords may not credit them or pay them for the work very sad example of a man taking off his prosthetic legs to paint and then still not being credited Landlord who after a fire where an 8 month old baby perished, worried about whether she would have to refund the rent no concern that her rental didn t provide working smoke detectors which may have saved this baby Very small percentage of poverty stricken who are assisted with housing 1% in rent controlled, 15% in public housing, 17% government subsidy the remaining 67% don t receive federal assistance Tenants having to choose between overlooking repairs such as working toilet or sink, broken window, etc and facing eviction The scarcity of these rentals allows landlords slumlords to be choosier in one instance, over 82 calls applications for an apartment resulted in 0 acceptances the presence of children in the household almost tripled a tenant s odds of receiving an eviction judgment The effect of living with children on receiving an eviction judgment is equivalent to falling four months behind in rent The annual income of the landlord of perhaps the worst trailer park in the fourth poorest city in America is 30 times that of his tenants working full time for minimum wage and 55 times the annual income of his tenants receiving welfare or disability I highly recommend this book to all American readers regardless of whether or not you normally read non fiction Evicted Poverty and Profit in the American City will educate you on poverty and the very little that the government does to provide support which could improve millions of lives Sadly, the author estimates that for the most part this additional support would actually reduce the fiscal burden on taxpayers as a whole We as a nation should be outraged at how little is being done and how what is being done is mismanaged and discriminatory Whatever our way out of this mess, one thing is certain This degree of inequality, this withdrawal of opportunity, this cold denial of basic needs, this endorsement of pointless suffering by no American value is this situation justified Thank you to NetGalley, Crown Publishing, and the author for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. flag 91 likesLike see review View all 27 comments Apr 24, 2016 Carol rated it it was amazing Recommends it for everyone in the U.S Shelves non fiction, awards, multi culti, brain food It is no surprise that Evicted was the University Wisconsin Madison s Go Big Red book read for 2016, a book chosen by the chancellor and worked into campus wide discussions and events Set in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, it examines the lives of a number of people who deal with eviction and the property owners To those outside the state, it might be less obvious how state politics have played into the background of many of the people in Evicted but suffice to say, the once independent State of Wisco It is no surprise that Evicted was the University Wisconsin Madison s Go Big Red book read for 2016, a book chosen by the chancellor and worked into campus wide discussions and events Set in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, it examines the lives of a number of people who deal with eviction and the property owners To those outside the state, it might be less obvious how state politics have played into the background of many of the people in Evicted but suffice to say, the once independent State of Wisconsin has fallen on conservative and judgemental times.At any rate, for non fiction book littered with references, it is extremely readable Done in a ethnographic style, it reminds me of Nickel and Dimed On Not Getting By in America Read these two back to back and I will guarantee you will go to bed thankful Like Enrich, Desmond tried to walk the talk by living in the trailer park he writes about by renting and living close to the subjects of the book, and by tailing the landlords as much as possible The last chapter of the book before the footnotes is an About the Project section that details his own history, his goals and his structure in writing the book I actually think it should be the first chapter, as it lends explanation and context to his sources and the style of writing For those who might be scared off by the voluminous footnotes, I recommend peeking at them many are actually commentary or elaborations on some of the personal details Definitely not one I would have wanted to read on Kindle.Unlike Nickel and Dimed, much of Desmond s material will be controversial, perhaps only serving to reinforce stereotypes about poor people In some ways, perhaps, this might be one of those books that says just about as much about the reviewer as the subject Being entirely honest with ourselves is hard, right , and it s easy to judge many of the people in the book Issue one, the simple one people without resources have high stakes and no cushion when they indulge or make mistakes as we all do For instance, I have a fat pile of COBRA paperwork waiting for me to read through it, and recently I spent 50 on chocolates for gifts for my personal references If I didn t deal with the COBRA paperwork, I d probably be fine unless I got in a traumatic car wreck , because I have prescriptions stocked, generally good health, financial resources and a job that will cover me in a month If a person in Evicted forgets to attend a caseworker appointment or forgets to file a change of address, they re screwed, because they will get no food stamps that month and have no saved resources to cushion them how can you save money when you only have 40 extra dollars a month Desmond does a decent job of making the costs of human indulgences clear, showing that the disabled, dishonorably discharged vet has exactly 40 dollars a month after rent, or that eating a lobster tail dinner means a month of ramen noodles Issue two, the complex one One of the most BRILLIANT and amazing things I ve read this year was an interview with Bruce Perry, psychologist about the long lasting effects of childhood trauma Read it here The essay talks quite a bit about what kind of constant physiological stress that does to the human brain, and how it changes learning and relationships Physiological stress can result in or even less reactive brain than one that has only smaller, intermittent amounts of stress leading to the million dollar question of how to we teach resilience A body that is always on alert because of safety issues, or a body that is always hungry is not one that will be in an environment of optimal function You see where I m going with this A majority of people in this story sprung from poverty They were born into it, had their brains wired by it, their coping skills and expectations structured by it They were set up to fail by traditional society Patricia s kids, the ones who are sharing a mattress on the floor in the living room Probably not going to be doctors and own the latest McMansion Not because they aren t capable of it, but their ongoing circumstances are going to continue to set them up to fail changing schools every time they move, missing school due to issues with housing resources, stress caused by having to find new housing every six months, the violence in the places they live, the lack of trustworthy relationships built where they live because how can you build them when you keep moving , and thus the cycle continues Desmond actually demonstrates impaired coping from ongoing stress when he shows how Arleen initially tries to deal with Crystal s generous but irrational moods and how Arleen eventually responds from a place of stress, anger and pride that makes the housing situation even worse I d even argue that Arleen was never set up to succeed in the first place from her childhood.Issue three, the other complex one addiction, that ongoing, ever present itch People will argue that heroin is a worse addiction I don t know you live long enough, you see addictions come in waves, like fads Meth was the rage in Wisconsin about ten years back Heroin is the hot drug these days Scott is the poster child for addiction in this book, a former nurse who got caught using and spiraled down You know how many sanctions are applied quarterly to nurses who use some kind of substance I d say over a hundred, at least WI Department of Regulation publishes a list of nurse sanctions and addiction related issues are by far the most common alcohol and drugs This is a horribly complex issue, and though Scott manages to rally after eviction, he falls again Now he s straight at the moment , thanks to a supportive recovering addicts residential housing program that also employs him You want to know about the homeless I meet Frequently addicts of some sort There are housing programs and shelters, but you have to be sober to get in, or stay sober for long term housing, and many addicts aren t willing to leave their addiction There aren t good answers for this one The trailer park Desmond lives in shows a little what a group of addicts living together must be like, how one of the residents goes door to door looking for a fix and knows he ll find it.Issue four, the last complex one mental illness Way back in Reagan era haha, I know you kids don t remember that , there was a huge movement to de institutionalize people with severe mental illness There are reasons for and against, but the upshot is that each community has to deal with how to care for a population that may not be able to adequately care for itself An excellent article gives some of the facts and figures that my own experience has demonstrated I d say about half of the people I ve had to take care of with schizophrenia have stopped taking their medication, which is part of what lands them in the hospital It s a well known and vicious cycle for people who are able to get access to medication meds make people feel better and in control, so they decide to stop the meds because they are feeling so great OR, the medications make people feel shittier, so they stop taking them Either way, the result is uncontrolled mental illness Desmond has a poster child for this one too, Crystal, who despite a consistent SSDI check and support from her faith community, frequently ends up evicted due to fighting with other tenants.What is less easy to see is how many of the people in the book are political pawns Newly imposed trailer park management and local police response to nuisance properties show how political stances have real and unintended consequences contributing to eviction The City of Madison was dealing with this in the past several years as well, finally forcing one of the local slumlords into cleaning up his properties that resulted in many being placed on the market He like landlords in the book argued he was providing housing for people too poor to rent elsewhere, unable to get housing due to criminal history or prior evictions latest story All of that said, somehow the slumlords have squeezed hundreds of thousands of dollars out of their properties I think the Madison one has a portfolio of over SIX million dollars, much like the trailer park owner in Evicted while letting the tenants live in conditions you d be furious to see at the local shelter.Desmond has a few suggestions First, is research, because good policies should be informed by reality His studies were one of the few looking at eviction and poverty More documentation should be done on it s effects in the neighborhood and on longer lasting effects He mentions people who are evicted end up having higher levels of material hardships for up to two years after eviction His immediate suggestion is better court advocates and legal aid which is being cut for those facing eviction so that they can help prevent evictions and further needless homelessness His ethical suggestion is that we recognize housing as a basic human right, not a mechanism of exploitation As I mentioned in my own Madison example, while the slumlords may claim they are providing at least some kind of housing, they aren t doing it as a public service His solution is expanding housing vouchers for all low income families, not just a small number are eligible for a voucher that can be used for anywhere that is decent, modest and fairly priced I m not sure Desmond is recognizing the things he experienced with Sherrena the landlord commenting on how taking voucher families was a pain because the buildings had to be up to code This is the part where I also think he is ignoring the roles that addiction and mental illness play in housing as well Still, he s offering something as a solution, and in an area that has the potential to negatively impact both individuals and communities, it s worth trying a solution or three or twenty til we can get it right Overall, an excellent book that provides much information for consideration and discussion Highly recommended flag 87 likesLike see review View all 45 comments Nov 26, 2016 Kelli rated it it was amazing Shelves favorites, audio Whatever our way out of this mess, one thing is certain This degree of inequality, this withdrawal of opportunity, this cold denial of basic needs, this endorsement of pointless suffering by no American value is this situation justified No moral code or ethical principle, no piece of scripture or holy teaching, can be summoned to defend what we have allowed our country to become I begin this review with what is essentially the end of this book There is another piece after this that will hav Whatever our way out of this mess, one thing is certain This degree of inequality, this withdrawal of opportunity, this cold denial of basic needs, this endorsement of pointless suffering by no American value is this situation justified No moral code or ethical principle, no piece of scripture or holy teaching, can be summoned to defend what we have allowed our country to become I begin this review with what is essentially the end of this book There is another piece after this that will have its own spotlight, but that quote above was the last paragraph of the epilogue And it was an epilogue I almost didn t listen to I believe there was an hour and forty three minutes remaining when the actual story ended I wasn t necessarily up for that I even considered it might be dead air How can an epilogue be that long Well, I would be remiss if I didn t tell you that the epilogue was mind blowing It was brilliant and in my opinion, the most important piece of this book, which in itself is a tremendous feat of research, dedication, drive, exploration and human kindness Herein lie the issues in laymen s terms along with some very intelligent and sensible suggestions for policy changes and steps toward solutions The story itself was devastating but necessary I live worlds away from what was described in these pages so the truth of it, the unforgiving honesty in the facts was equal parts shocking and depressing It is undeniable that the system is tremendously flawed The eviction process, the landlords, the tenants were all characters jockeying for position in a cyclical nightmare Although always interested, at one point I realized that one story blended into the next It became challenging to remember who was where, until I realized that it s truly such a blurtake out this person, insert that personand my heart broke a little bit In the section following the epilogue entitled About This Project, the author details how he collected the data and how the project has impacted him view spoiler Though it was mentioned on the book jacket that this was embedded research, I still found the most impactful statement to be I moved into Tobin s trailer park in May 2008 hide spoiler Somehow I lost myself completely in this story and never considered this as a possibility This left me speechless This is the best book I have read this year and certainly the most important I ve done nothing but talk about this book since I started it but I need to accept that there aren t words to properly salute this incredible work Upon finishing this, I wanted to drive straight to Harvard and sit outside the author s office I still do actually, not so much to discuss but to just lay eyes on such a decent human being, to tell him that the world needs people like him to educate, to challenge what is and to help this broken world.This book deserves a far better review than what I have written here As I consider what else to write, please get this book with its haunting cover and its important message 5 stars I still cannot stop thinking about this book I think I m going to read it again flag 84 likesLike see review View all 18 comments Sep 11, 2016 Diane rated it it was amazing Shelves sociology psychology, nonfiction, audiobooks, economics Wow, this is a powerful look at what it means to be poor in America The book follows eight families in the Milwaukee area, all facing eviction problems Some of the families are white, some are black, some have children All of them struggled to pay the monthly rent, which seemed ridiculously high for the broken down places they got Families have watched their incomes stagnate, or even fall, while their housing costs have soared Today, the majority of poor renting families in America spend ov Wow, this is a powerful look at what it means to be poor in America The book follows eight families in the Milwaukee area, all facing eviction problems Some of the families are white, some are black, some have children All of them struggled to pay the monthly rent, which seemed ridiculously high for the broken down places they got Families have watched their incomes stagnate, or even fall, while their housing costs have soared Today, the majority of poor renting families in America spend over half of their income on housing, and at least one in four dedicates 70 percent to paying the rent and keeping the lights on Millions of Americans are evicted every year because they can t make rent.Matthew Desmond, who is a sociology professor at Harvard, spent time living among the families and following their routines He also interviewed and followed two landlords His research and writing took years, and it shows in the quality of his work.I listened to this book on audio, but I m glad I had a print copy to refer to because there were dozens of amazing passages I marked There were things in this book that made me gasp in shock Several times I swore at the injustice of it all In the end, Desmond offers some possible solutions to improve the housing and eviction problems in this country Evicted reminded me of two other great books about class and poverty Nickel and Dimed by Barbara Ehrereich, in which she sees how challenging it is to work and survive on minimum wages and Behind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine Boo, which follows poor families in a slum in Mumbai Evicted is a worthy addition to the research on poverty, and I highly recommend it What Made Me AngryI m going to rant a little about some of the issues I learned from this book One part that made me drop the F bomb because I couldn t believe the insanity of it, was how tenants in the inner city can actually be penalized and evicted if they call 911 too many times In this book, a young woman named Crystal hears a neighbor woman being beaten by her boyfriend, and Crystal calls 911 But the Milwaukee Police determine that too many 911 calls have come from Crystal s apartment, and they notify the landlord in this paragraph I ll call her a slumlord, since she exploited her tenants and did next to nothing to make the urban properties livable The slumlord tells police she ll evict the tenants, which is eventually what happens Desmond says this problem happens ALL THE TIME He says battered women face a devil s bargain Keep quiet and face abuse, or call the police and face eviction What The Fuck Oh I almost forgot the most enraging part At one point, the Milwaukee police chief held a news conference to address the high number of women who ve been killed in domestic violence incidents, and he expresses disbelief at how few of the victims contacted the police department You ve got to be fucking kidding me Guy, it s your department s own backward policies that are helping to kill those women I was also furious about how the slumlords exploited their impoverished tenants, and refused to invest any money in the properties to make them livable It was deplorable behavior And the fact that the slumlords claim they re helping the tenants, and trying to do good in the neighborhood, is seriously questionable.There was also an eye opening section on the poverty mentality, and how those who are deeply impoverished aren t necessarily poor because they throw money away, but they throw money away because they are poor Those in deep poverty lack hope that their situation will ever improve Their argument is What s the point of saving a few dollars by denying myself a few luxuries such as cable TV, or a nice dinner if I m always going to be broke, and always struggling to make the rent They re trying to live in color for just a little bit Of course, it s easy for those of us with a financial safety net and loved ones who could help us in times of trouble to look down on those at the bottom and frown on them But unless you ve been so low that you have no hope for tomorrow, it s difficult to judge those in deep despair.Great Passages Evictions embroil not only landlord and tenants but also kin and friends, lovers and ex lovers, judges and lawyers, dope suppliers and church elders Eviction s fallout is severe Losing a home sends families to shelters, abandoned houses, and the street It invites depression and illness, compels families to move into degrading housing in dangerous neighborhoods, uproots communities, and harms children Eviction reveals people s vulnerability and desperation, as well as their ingenuity and guts If incarceration had come to define the lives of men from impoverished black neighborhoods, eviction was shaping the lives of women Poor black men were locked up Poor black women were locked out It was next to impossible for people to survive deep poverty on their own If you could not rely on your family, you could reach out to strangers, make disposable ties But it was a lot to ask of someone you barely knew There was always something worse than the trailer park, always room to drop lower Substandard housing was a blow to your psychological health not only because things like dampness, mold, and overcrowding could bring about depression but also because of what living in awful conditions told you about yourself Poverty could pile on living it often meant steering through gnarled thickets of interconnected misfortunes and trying not to go crazy There were moments of calm, but life on balance was facing one crisis after another The home is the center of life It is a refuge from the grind of work, the pressure of school, and the menace of the streets We say that at home, we can be ourselves Everywhere else, we are someone else At home, we remove our masks The persistence and brutality of American poverty can be disheartening, leaving us cynical about solutions But a good home can serve as the sturdiest of footholds When people have a place to live, they become better parents, workers, and citizens flag 83 likesLike see review View all 14 comments Apr 22, 2016 Kelly and the Book Boar rated it really liked it Shelves arcs, non fiction, black as mitchell s heart, skillet to the face, i is smart, read in 2016 Find all of my reviews at book This book was Per usual when I read a good hardcover, 1 I failed to watch my children play in their baseball games and instead kept my tunnel vision pointed directly at the book and 2 the flagging of the pages happened which made all of the parents around me give me the that b % be cray look Buuuuuuuuuuuut as also per usual, I m not really going to quote anything that I post it noted After read Find all of my reviews at book This book was Per usual when I read a good hardcover, 1 I failed to watch my children play in their baseball games and instead kept my tunnel vision pointed directly at the book and 2 the flagging of the pages happened which made all of the parents around me give me the that b % be cray look Buuuuuuuuuuuut as also per usual, I m not really going to quote anything that I post it noted After reading Evicted I was left with one reaction If you really want to provide yourself a justifiable excuse to hate the human race, this is the book for you Evicted follows the lives of several people living in poverty and trying or not, as the case may be to get ahead From Sharrena the slumlord, to her tenants Lamar a man who lost his legs when they froze while he was high, and Arleen a woman who already lost children to the system, but is trying to hold on to her two youngest, to Tobin the owner of a trailer park and Lenny the property manager of sorts, to Scott a former nurse who got addicted to drugs and couldn t stop the downward spiral, to Larraine the resident looney tune of the park Matthew Desmond immersed himself into the lives of these people living with them rather than just conducting a few interviews and going back to his comfortable lifestyle The story he presents is one that reads like a novel rather than non fiction Filled with dialogue and experiences rather than statistics it was a truly un put down able read and it allowed me the opportunity to confirm what I ve known for quite some time now Every single person in this story was despicable in at least one way, shape or form and made it impossible to ever really feel sorry for them You want to side with the landlord who is getting screwed over by tenants who don t pay the rent, but manage to buy dope, smokes and booze but at the same time you want to kick her ass for charging people to live in uninhabitable conditions literally, a house she was charging 600 for was CONDEMNED You also want to feel for the mother who has 20 left to her name after paying rent until she opens her mouth and proves she believes she is owed something for doing nothing and takes advantage over and over again of ANY generosity shown to her You feel for Larraine, because obviously she is in need of some mental health services until she becomes one of the oldest clich s in the history of the food stamp recipient who spends her entire month s sum on one lobster and king crab dinner I could go on and on The lesson to be learned here is glaringly obvious The system is broken It s been broken since the Five Points were built in the 1800s and it s not getting any better Evicted didn t spend time getting preachy or even offering up than a couple of suggestions on how to potentially relieve some of the pressure on the impoverished It just laid everything out there in black and white and that is maybe the most compelling argument of all Review copy received from Blogging for Books in exchange for an honest review. flag 72 likesLike see review View all 23 comments Dec 06, 2016 Christy rated it it was amazing 1 28 17 UPDATE Author Roxane Gay was asked what was the last book that made you furious She said Evicted, by Matthew Desmond My God, what that book lays bare about American poverty It is devastating and infuriating and a necessary read Yep I continue to think this book says oodles than Hillbilly Elegy A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis about poverty, class, and the American Dream I try to remember to share this last stanza of Pretty Boy Floyd, the song by Woody Guth 1 28 17 UPDATE Author Roxane Gay was asked what was the last book that made you furious She said Evicted, by Matthew Desmond My God, what that book lays bare about American poverty It is devastating and infuriating and a necessary read Yep I continue to think this book says oodles than Hillbilly Elegy A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis about poverty, class, and the American Dream I try to remember to share this last stanza of Pretty Boy Floyd, the song by Woody Guthrie, the week we work on poverty in Introductory Sociology Yes, as through this world I ve wanderedI ve seen lots of funny men Some will rob you with a six gun,And some with a fountain pen.And as through your life you travel,Yes, as through your life you roam,You won t never see an outlawDrive a family from their home.Often this shocks students to consider the inhumane way we regularly treat each other, and that the it s just business attitude can drive many families into homelessness and shelter living The lyrics focus us on the nature of criminality, and whether acts are ethical even if legal, etc..The best type of qualitative, sociological analysis, Desmond tugs at our heartstrings until we ache with relentless story after story of people who are evicted from their homes Having a secure place to live provides us with human dignity, and most developed countries guarantee a place to stay by virtue of the fact of being a member of that society Not so in the wealthiest country in the world In the US, we can still remember Ronald Reagan with his arm around a homeless man, agreeing with him that most people who are homeless choose to be so We tend to blame people for their own circumstances quite resolutely The cover is this book is powerful enough Indeed, I had it several days before realizing the picture was one of a wall of vacated home, showing the lighter places once pictures were taken off their hooks I had a number of students star at the book cover as it was here on my desk for quite a while, and they often asked about the picture, also slow to recognize it Our hesitancy to come to recognize and come to grips with the pain of a family, often, losing a home speaks volumes in itself Desmond brings us into the lives of many in Milwaukee during the time directly after the 08 crash and in the midst of the major home foreclosure crisis, and while he garners some sympathy for landlords, who reasonable only want to get paid for rent, what is clear is that no one can live a productive much less meaningful life while worrying how to provide shelter for yourself and your family.I was reminded of Michael Moore s lament that increasingly the working class became the Man , the landlord, as Rustbelt workers with good paying jobs through the 70s rented out basement apartments and invested in rental real estate Moore claimed this further separated the psychological perspectives as well as the actual living circumstances of the working poor renters from the lower middle class increasingly landlords themselves Please let me end with Hana s great review of Chain of Title How Three Ordinary Americans Uncovered Wall Street s Great Foreclosure Fraud that you can find here it is horrifying to learn that Trump has just appointed Mnuchin for Treasury Secretary, who personally benefited from the corruption of the foreclosure crisis in California In the US, we must be vigilant with ongoing crony capitalism that continues to gather the wealth of the 99% More and I m reminded of that old saying by Mellon the capitalist that it s during economic downturns when money flows back to its rightful owners flag 67 likesLike see review View all 28 comments Mar 31, 2016 Shelby trains flying monkeys rated it it was amazing Shelves from publisher, sometimes i read smart stuffs, read 2016 This is definitely not Good Times I didn t realize until I read the afterward that the author of this book put himself right into the middle of the people he portrays lives He gave them rides to look for houses, he even loaned them small amounts of money at times He admits that he misses living in the trailer park among them This book I hope people get it and read it I ve been on a smart book kick lately and I ve starred them all pretty highly but this one is just amazing Desmond kn This is definitely not Good Times I didn t realize until I read the afterward that the author of this book put himself right into the middle of the people he portrays lives He gave them rides to look for houses, he even loaned them small amounts of money at times He admits that he misses living in the trailer park among them This book I hope people get it and read it I ve been on a smart book kick lately and I ve starred them all pretty highly but this one is just amazing Desmond knocks it out of the ballpark You can tell he puts his whole heart into telling these stories.Now the stories..they are real people You have to keep reminding yourself of that as you read this book because no one is perfect, they all mess up and the writing is so good that you feel like you are just reading a really good work of fiction.Set in Milwaukee, he tells the stories of families.Lamar, who has no legs Takes in all his boys from the neighborhood and they work to help him just try and get ahead.Scott, a nurse from the trailer park He gets addicted to drugs and ends up homeless because he can t see past the addiction and feels so overwhelmed with all that he would have to do in order to just get clean and hopefully get his nursing license back.Scott had gotten high with Pam and Ned shortly before they received their eviction notice and had moved in a hurry Scott figured they had gotten what was coming to them In his old life, before the fall, he might have been sympathetic But he had come to view sympathy as a kind of na vet , a sentiment voiced from a certain distance by the callow middle classes They can be compassionate because it s not their only option, he said of liberals who didn t live in trailer parks.Vanetta, she is waiting on her court case because she and a friend robbed some women at gunpoint because she needs to support her children.Sherrena and her husband, landlords in the ghetto They get frustrated with the people they rent to and sometimes try and help but it s a vicious circle They feel like the people they try to help just want to take and take They don t want to have to spend out the money to fix anything in their properties because why bother It s just going to get destroyed again.Tobin, runs a shabby run down trailer park He doesn t have time to listen to excuses Just give him the money.Arleen, she had lost her older children to foster care and is struggling to hold on to her remaining two but it seems like the odds are always stacked against this woman She broke my heart It seemed like when things would go well for her that it was just a matter of time When Jori wanted something most teenagers want, new shoes or a hair product, she would tell him he was selfish or just bad When Jafaris cried, Arleen sometimes yelled, Damn, you hardheaded Dry yo face up or Stop it, Jafaris, before I beat yo ass I m tired of your bitch ass You could only say I m sorry, I can t so many times before you began to feel worthless, edging closer to the breaking point So you protected yourself, in a reflexive way, by finding ways to say No, I won t I cannot help you So, I will find you unworthy of help.Larraine, she frustrates the people around her with her inability to manage what little money she does get My aunt Larraine is one of those people who will see some two hundred dollar beauty cream that removes her wrinkles and will go and buy it instead of paying her rent To Sammy, Pastor Daryl, and others, Larraine was poor because she threw money away But the reverse was true Larraine threw money away because she was poor.This book gives perspective We need some changes in welfare reform Don t think it couldn t happen to you eitherIt made me very appreciative of what I have Booksource Blogging for Books in exchange for review. Reviews for this book are pretty high and I completely see why My friend Joanne s is another that found this book amazing flag 156 likesLike see review View all 45 comments Jun 17, 2017 Dianne rated it really liked it Shelves best of 2017 What A Goat Rodeo.Super interesting and frustrating and appalling and unbelievable and believable and terrifying and infuriating and heartbreaking andwell, you get the idea The first part of this Pulitzer Prize winning book brings together a handful of characters landlords and tenants in a poor Milwaukee neighborhood and tells their stories what brought them to where they are, what keeps them stuck in poverty, what options if any they have Desmond does a really good job of choos What A Goat Rodeo.Super interesting and frustrating and appalling and unbelievable and believable and terrifying and infuriating and heartbreaking andwell, you get the idea The first part of this Pulitzer Prize winning book brings together a handful of characters landlords and tenants in a poor Milwaukee neighborhood and tells their stories what brought them to where they are, what keeps them stuck in poverty, what options if any they have Desmond does a really good job of choosing his characters there s a good variety of circumstances and personalities that give the stories life and heart No one is all bad or all wrong, and no one is all good or all right The next part of the book, after the stories have been told, is called Epilogue and offers facts and statistics about housing and offers some solutions I ll be honest, this was pretty dry The next part of the book was fascinating called About This Project, the author reveals that he implanted himself in this Milwaukee neighborhood and lived amongst his landlords and tenants for a year to gather their stories and study their plight Finally, there is 60 pages of footnotes that provide the studies, data and details behind the scenes.It s a scholarly piece of literature with a big, heavy heart I don t know how this situation, in reality, can ever be fixed given the current state of US politics All we do is argue, accuse, rant and point fingers the collaboration and bipartisan cooperation that would have to occur to implement real solutions in our cities will probably never happen in my lifetime While we bicker, Rome is burning Read this and do some deep thinking Understanding is the first step to real change flag 57 likesLike see review View all 14 comments May 18, 2016 Navidad Thelamour rated it really liked it Shelves netgalley, non fiction, read 2016, reviewed on , reviewed on barnesandnoble, cultural surveys, mental illness, full review Matthew Desmond s research driven prose is a dazzling work of examination and insight Within these pages, the business and culture of evictions is dissected down to the very dollars and cents that uphold this thriving industry The judicial system and the role it plays is scrutinized, and the lives of 8 families are put on intimate display for readers to bear witness to Within the pages of Eviction, Desmond paints a clandestine portrait of the precarious lives of those living at and below the Matthew Desmond s research driven prose is a dazzling work of examination and insight Within these pages, the business and culture of evictions is dissected down to the very dollars and cents that uphold this thriving industry The judicial system and the role it plays is scrutinized, and the lives of 8 families are put on intimate display for readers to bear witness to Within the pages of Eviction, Desmond paints a clandestine portrait of the precarious lives of those living at and below the poverty line in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, during the time of his research The survey into this little known world is done first hand, with the aid of a tape recorder, and thus is the most personal and complete look at modern American poverty that I have read in a long time Here, readers will follow the desolate, the addicted, the impoverished and the lords who shape their lives in these dangerous and volatile social environments called homes This book unveiled some of the most stunningly accurate vernacular and dialogue that I have seen anywhere, non fiction or fiction Note to self if you want to really capture the essence of a culture, use a tape recorder With this simple technique, Desmond was able to capture the true personification of the frustration and despair, of their interactions and intentions, and, hence, the dialogue told a story all of its own within these pages It told a story of where these people came from and how they truly related to one another on a human level He captured the true swag of these neighborhoods, the soul and essence that can t be seen at first passing glance out of a car window The research in Evicted was expertly incorporated so that it read as fluidly in narrative as a fiction novel, and it was incorporated throughout, which was great, because it allowed the reader to absorb the information with illustrations of narration to make it easier and faster to digest It also allowed for a read that wasn t leaden with factoids, reading like a dry and tedious text book The lives he chose to chronicle and exhibit were harrowing and demonstrative of humanity s capacity to fail and to survive, to overcome and to find comfort in community It also pulled back the curtains on this booming industry that both exploits the poor and treats them as expendable members of society In Evicted, Desmond dissected a truth that goes back to the Civil Rights Movement when Fair Housing laws were enacted Stirring and emotional, this read holds a shiny mirror to the face of America Similar to the PIC Prison Industrial Complex the eviction process, nay culture, is a vicious and debilitating cycle with ripple effects into communities This expos displayed how crime and evictions go hand in hand, each leading to the other with alarming frequency, a form of institutionalized parasitism on the poor at the hands of the judicial system and slum lords in the instances where there are, in fact, slum lords Here, Desmond portrays both the crimes that lead to evictions and the evictions that foster a bed of crimes This work really appealed to me when I read its blurb, and it did not disappoint It was not a traumatically graphic read, but it was all consuming Vignette after vignette portrayed the mental and emotional anguish that living at the poverty line heaps on it dwellers so that the only reprieve came in the form of spirited dialogue and intimate conversations between those he chronicled and their family and friends and from the research that clarified the stats behind their suffering, which was interspersed throughout Other than that, there was no reprieve from the grief, struggling and suffering and, in a way, I think that that was not only the point of this read but, in many ways, an intellectual profit to the reader Within these pages, those who could never in their own everyday lives imagine such hardships will be transported over the imaginary line that exists in all cities the line between the haves and the have nots That is a line that everyone should cross at some time, so pick up this read preparing to take a journey Evicted gained itself a strong 4 stars I received a copy of Evicted Poverty and Profit in the American City from the publisher, Crown, via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review To see reviews, go to The Navi Review at www.thenavireview.com, and follow the blog on Twitter thenavireview flag 53 likesLike see review View all 11 comments Dec 30, 2015 Lorilin rated it really liked it Shelves memoir, politics, arc In Evicted, Matthew Desmond shares the experiences of eight families as they try to make ends meet in the most run down neighborhoods of Milwaukee And this would be interesting enough, but, amazingly, Desmond ALSO shares the experiences of two landlords who manage some of the properties where these families live All together, it makes for some engaging, eye opening, big picture reading.You d think that a 400 page tome about such a weighty and depressing topic would be a tedious and slightly im In Evicted, Matthew Desmond shares the experiences of eight families as they try to make ends meet in the most run down neighborhoods of Milwaukee And this would be interesting enough, but, amazingly, Desmond ALSO shares the experiences of two landlords who manage some of the properties where these families live All together, it makes for some engaging, eye opening, big picture reading.You d think that a 400 page tome about such a weighty and depressing topic would be a tedious and slightly impossible read But, wow, I couldn t believe how quickly I tore through this book Desmond is so good at incorporating dialogue and narrative with facts and statistics, that most of the time I felt like I was reading a novel It helps, too, that Desmond is never heavy handed in the way he delivers information Yes, his point is to shed light on a particular social issue, but I never felt like he was taking sides or forcing his beliefs on me He really lets the facts speak for themselves.And, truthfully, I don t think I had ever stopped to consider, as Desmond puts it, how deeply housing is implicated in the creation of poverty He says, Not everyone living in a distressed neighborhood is associated with gang members, parole officers, employers, social workers, or pastors But nearly all of them have a landlord That s a good dang point.When I finished this book, I knew I had learned a lot about this important issue but, important than that, I felt like I had connected to this Big Issue on a very personal level These stories, these people, will stay with me I only hope that Desmond eventually includes an update on where the families are now, because I d love to know flag 55 likesLike see review View all 5 comments Feb 25, 2016 Hadrian rated it it was amazing Shelves society culture anthropology etc, economics finance business, nonfiction, urban studies, social justice, race racism postcolonial No moral code or ethical principle, no piece of scripture or holy teaching, can be summoned to defend what we have allowed our country to become.Evicted is a study of poverty and the problems of rent payments in the city of Milwaukee As rents increase where property values stagnate or decline, the poorest have to spend 70 90% of their income on housing With such a small margin of income, a single crisis illness, car crash, emergency repairs can send the residents into eviction Once that h No moral code or ethical principle, no piece of scripture or holy teaching, can be summoned to defend what we have allowed our country to become.Evicted is a study of poverty and the problems of rent payments in the city of Milwaukee As rents increase where property values stagnate or decline, the poorest have to spend 70 90% of their income on housing With such a small margin of income, a single crisis illness, car crash, emergency repairs can send the residents into eviction Once that happens, it becomes exponentially harder to get housing anywhere else This is not only a book of statistics it follows the stories of a few families as they struggle to survive You want desperately for them to get better To get clean, to have a landlord call them back, to get a real job It is an understanding of the psychology of want, hopelessness, anger, where everything becomes duller from want Where any creature comforts are valuable because you have sunken far behind the hope of any financial stability This is something every American must read flag 58 likesLike see review View all 5 comments Nov 01, 2016 Richard Derus rated it it was amazing Review 5 of fiveI voted for this book in the 2016 Goodreads Choice Awards Why Because I m a radical who wants to re rig the system and change the course of the Ship of State 180 degrees Every condition exists, Martin Luther King Jr once wrote, simply because someone profits by its existence This economic exploitation is crystallized in the slum Exploitation Now, there s a word that has been scrubbed out of the poverty debate and there it is, simply and baldly put The poor are exp Review 5 of fiveI voted for this book in the 2016 Goodreads Choice Awards Why Because I m a radical who wants to re rig the system and change the course of the Ship of State 180 degrees Every condition exists, Martin Luther King Jr once wrote, simply because someone profits by its existence This economic exploitation is crystallized in the slum Exploitation Now, there s a word that has been scrubbed out of the poverty debate and there it is, simply and baldly put The poor are exploited mercilessly by every single sector of capitalist society If poverty persists in America, it is not for lack of resources the author just made, in one short sentence, the only real and relevant case for Universal Basic Income flag 39 likesLike see review View all 4 comments Apr 25, 2016 Jessica rated it it was amazing Shelves nonfiction, favorites This book ought to be required reading for anyone who wants to hold elected office in this country, no matter what level you re at It s immersive sociological reporting at its finest at the height of the recession, Matthew Desmond moved into some of the poorest sections of Milwaukee and immersed himself in the lives of the people who had little choice but to live there He tells the stories of the tenants and the landlords in their own voices, with such clarity and precision that it s almost ea This book ought to be required reading for anyone who wants to hold elected office in this country, no matter what level you re at It s immersive sociological reporting at its finest at the height of the recession, Matthew Desmond moved into some of the poorest sections of Milwaukee and immersed himself in the lives of the people who had little choice but to live there He tells the stories of the tenants and the landlords in their own voices, with such clarity and precision that it s almost easy to forget that this is not a novel This is real life, and it s an incredibly important work The truth is that poverty, homelessness, and the constant threat of eviction are issues that are nearly impossible to understand unless you ve been there yourself and too many of the people making policies on these topics fail to grasp the realities of poverty I think particularly of a piece on poverty by Bill O Reilly he was trying to point out the ways in which the welfare system is abused by saying that than 90% of people below the poverty line have refrigerators And all I could think was even the shittiest apartments I ve ever seen have come with a refrigerator Just because someone is renting an apartment with a refrigerator does not mean they bought the refrigerator. How can you criticize the poor let alone help them if you don t have even the most basic understanding of poverty Before I got my MA in English and started working in books, I was actually a psychology major When I told the internship supervisor at my high school what I was thinking about studying in college, she suggested that I do my internship at a residential homeless shelter nearby And even though I ultimately decided I didn t have what it takes to work in a field like that, my semester there was a real eye opener The thing that stuck with me the most was how easy it was to become homeless due to even one small setback and how hard it was to climb back out of it and stay out of it for good A man came to us because a back surgery depleted his bank account and cost him his job Several women arrived because they left an abusive partner and had nowhere else to turn Several had lost everything to an addiction they were battling to keep under control Too many were simply unable to find or hold onto a job for long enough to pay rent sometimes they were irresponsible, but sometimes they were just unfortunate Desmond has filled this book with similar stories His subjects run the gamut a nurse who lost everything to an addiction to the opioids he used to battle chronic pain and grief, the no nonsense manager of a trailer park, a single mother spending as much as 80% of her meager welfare check on rent for an apartment with no functional plumbing, the slumlord who evicts the family a few days before Christmas after one too many second chances, a man with no legs who performs various maintenance duties for his landlord in an attempt to reduce the amount of back rent he owes, a woman who spend every extra penny she manages to scrounge up on luxuries you might deem unnecessary the proverbial lobster dinner on food stamps Side note I appreciate that Desmond points out why people in abject poverty will sometimes engage in spending habits that drive outsiders insane, which is also something that I ve seen many, many, many times in my own life if you so rarely have an extra 100 lying around that its occasional presence is notable, you don t expect that you ll ever be able to save enough to amount to anything so you figure why not spend it on something that it going to make things just a little brighter, even for the length on a lobster dinner I know that s a sticking point for so many people who are opposed to public assistance programs I get why it s so frustrating but I also get why people using public assistance do things like that Desmond doesn t too much time advocating for a particular solution, but his epilogue argues for increasing the reach of housing vouchers and suggests that he d be in favor of programs like the one that Utah has used in recent years to make drastic reductions in their homeless numbers Surprise housing the chronically homeless costs the state less than when they re on the street Even bigger surprise once they have a home, they are able to focus on solving the problems that contributed to their homelessness in the first place and they re likely to get off the public assistance that wasn t assisting them all that much to begin with Anyway, this is a phenomenally well researched, well written book that is going to make you angry You re going to be angry at the tenants who make bad choices, angry at the landlords who won t make repairs because they know they can serve eviction papers and someone else will pay for substandard housing, angry at the system that allows these situations to perpetuate It can sometimes be hard to keep the many stories straight, but Desmond doesn t bog his reader down with too many numbers his stats and methodology are included in the extensive notes and the epilogue For such a big book, it s an easy read It s so highly recommended flag 39 likesLike see review View all 7 comments Apr 13, 2017 Clif Hostetler rated it liked it review of another edition Shelves current events This book describes the misery of living at the ragged edge of homelessness The first 80 percent of the book follows in detail the experiences of eight low income families including both black and white in Milwaukee, Wisconsin The final part of the book is a long Epilogue that provides a concluding summary and a description of how the author collected his information and data by living among the subjects he writes about The reading experience of exposure to the stories in this book is distu This book describes the misery of living at the ragged edge of homelessness The first 80 percent of the book follows in detail the experiences of eight low income families including both black and white in Milwaukee, Wisconsin The final part of the book is a long Epilogue that provides a concluding summary and a description of how the author collected his information and data by living among the subjects he writes about The reading experience of exposure to the stories in this book is disturbing It includes incident after incident where people are facing miserable dilemmas in their efforts to find housing It was a relief to reach the Epilogue at the end where I knew there weren t going to be additional hard luck stories to read Evictions are a growing problem that is creeping up the economic ladder The 2008 housing crash and subsequent foreclosures turned millions of former homeowners into renters, which kept rents rising even as incomes fell view spoiler Between 2001 and 2014, real rents rose 7 percent while renters incomes fell 9 percent As a result, the number of households paying than 30 percent of their income for shelter rose to a record 21.3 million about one in six nationwide And the number paying than half their incomes rose even faster, to 11.4 million, from 7.5 million, Among them, 30 percent included a full time worker hide spoiler The number of low income housing units has not increased to match this demand Consequently, the only market force preventing rental rates from rising even higher is the ability of renters to pay The competition for rental space has forced a growing number of low income households to pay crushing shares of their income for shelter view spoiler The government says that rent and utilities are affordable if they consume no than 30 percent of the household s income Analyzing census data, this book finds that the majority of poor households pay over 50 percent of their income for shelter and than a quarter pay over 70 percent Among the tenants in housing court, a third spend at least 80 percent The squeeze is increasing higher incomes as well Even among households earning between 30,000 and 45,000 a year clerks, cooks, or low level medical technicians, for example nearly half pay than the 30 percent the government says they can afford Of them, 10 percent devote at least half their income to shelter hide spoiler Another fact brought out by this book is that eviction isn t just another hardship, but rather a forced entry onto a much harder path with harsh consequences a cause, not just a condition, of poverty In other words, once a renter has an eviction on their records, many landlords will be reluctant to rent to them Even the government low income rental program which has long waiting lists consider past evictions to be a negative mark on their record Another sad fact is that the frequency of evictions falls disproportionately on poor women They are likely to have dependent children under their care which can lead to problems leading to eviction Also, police calls due to physical abuse inflicted by boyfriends leads to some evictions because police calls are considered to be a undesirable nuisance In Milwaukee s poorest black neighborhoods, eviction had become commonplace especially for women In those neighborhoods, 1 female renter in 17 was evicted through the court system each year, which was twice as often as men from those neighborhoods and nine times as often as women from the city s poorest white areas Women from black neighborhoods made up 9 percent of Milwaukee s population and 30 percent of its evicted tenants.If incarceration had come to define the lives of men from impoverished black neighborhoods, eviction was shaping the lives of women Poor black men were locked up Poor black women were locked out underline emphasis is mine Among the individuals interviewed extensively by the author was an entrepreneurial African American woman who is the owner of numerous rental units and is one of the landlords issuing eviction orders By including the story of a landlord in the book the author has included the other side of the story Landlords need to maximize the amount of income from their rental units in order pay their bank loans But one of the points of the book is that there is plenty of money to be made in renting to impoverished tenants Maintenance and upkeep doesn t cost much because poor people can t complain for fear of eviction.Tenants who fell behind either had to accept unpleasant, degrading, and sometimes dangerous housing conditions or be evicted.Evictions have negative consequences for whole neighborhoods, including those remaining who have not been evicted Evictions destabilize neighborhoods The people come and go, the less chance there is for cohesion and neighborhoods become less safe The effects are enduring, as measured by incidents like hunger or lost utilities The year after eviction, families experience 20 percent higher levels of material hardships than similar families who were not evicted.The availability of affordable rental units has not kept pace with the rise in demand In 1970, the US had nearly a million affordable units than poor households, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities Two decades later, the situation had reversed there were five million poor households than affordable units In the Epilogue the author makes the case for a universal voucher program Such a voucher program would need to include some sort of rental rate controls, otherwise increased availability of money would simply increase rental rates But rental rates would need to be sufficient to make construction of affordable units financially viable The author believes a comprehensive universal voucher program would change the face of poverty in this country Evictions would plummet and become rare occurrences Homelessness would almost disappear Families would immediately feel the income gains and be able to buy enough food, invest in themselves and their children through schooling or job training, and start modest savings.Regarding the present situation in the United States, the author has the following comment No moral code or ethical principle, no piece of scripture or holy teaching, can be summoned to defend what we have allowed our country to become flag 35 likesLike see review View all 10 comments Apr 17, 2017 Jenny Reading Envy rated it it was amazing Shelves pulitzer, read2017 This author is coming to my institution on Wednesday so I sped through the reading of this book, making some notes.I think I ll start by saying how impressed I was by how he did the research, which you don t learn about until the end of the book He lives in Tobin s trailer park He lives with Scott He moves to the north side and acknowledges this weird white buffer he is given Along the way he develops relationships with people struggling to stay in their housing, with landlords who are parti This author is coming to my institution on Wednesday so I sped through the reading of this book, making some notes.I think I ll start by saying how impressed I was by how he did the research, which you don t learn about until the end of the book He lives in Tobin s trailer park He lives with Scott He moves to the north side and acknowledges this weird white buffer he is given Along the way he develops relationships with people struggling to stay in their housing, with landlords who are participating in typical practices, with social workers and cops and others in the system in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.He uses Milwaukee as an example of a large city that isn t as huge as New York, Chicago, or Detroit, to capture of the typical experience of someone facing eviction He tells the story through eight different families The people and situations are complicated, and they are further complicated with each eviction It s too big to write about right now, so I ll dump these facts and quotes here for a bit Three in four families who qualified for assistance received nothing 59 Eviction had a way of causing not one move but two a forced move into degrading and sometimes dangerous housing and an intentional move out of it 69 A single eviction could destabilize multiple city blocks 71 For many landlords, it was cheaper to deal with the expense of eviction than to maintain their properties it was possible to skimp on maintenance if tenants were perpetually behind and many poor tenants would be perpetually behind because their rent was too high 75 Screening practices that banned criminality and poverty in the same stroke drew poor families shoulder to shoulder with drug dealers, sex offenders, and other lawbreakers 89 70% storage from eviction gets trashed It was not enough simply to perceive injustice Mass resistance was possible only when people believed they had the collective capacity to change things For poor people, this required identifying with the oppressed, and counting yourself among them which was something most trailer park residents were absolutely unwilling to do.For residents, the goal was to leave, not to plant roots and change things Some residents described themselves as just passing through, even if they had been passing through nearly all their life 181 The issue of facing eviction simply for calling the police or an ambulance nuisance citations America is supposed to be a place where you can better yourself, your family, and your community But this is only possible if you have as table home 294 Residential stability emotional stability flag 31 likesLike see review View all 14 comments Jul 03, 2017 Thomas rated it really liked it Shelves nonfiction, own physical, pulitzer prize 4.5 starsA fantastic and difficult book that follows eight families in Milwaukee as they struggle to keep a roof over their heads Evicted shows the challenges these white and black families encounter as they fail to pay their rent, get evicted, and experience countless cruelties along the way The book recognizes these families humanity by showing their remarkable resilience and kindness as well as their mistakes Matthew Desmond ends the book by revealing the vast reporting and research he pu 4.5 starsA fantastic and difficult book that follows eight families in Milwaukee as they struggle to keep a roof over their heads Evicted shows the challenges these white and black families encounter as they fail to pay their rent, get evicted, and experience countless cruelties along the way The book recognizes these families humanity by showing their remarkable resilience and kindness as well as their mistakes Matthew Desmond ends the book by revealing the vast reporting and research he put into Evicted, as well as by suggesting effective and tangible strategies to combat poverty and income inequality within the United States.I would recommend this book to everyone It disturbs me to consider how the events in Evicted could happen to anyone if they had been born into unfortunate circumstances It is easy to blame poverty on poor people s lack of willpower or their laziness, but in reality it is our fault and our government s fault for not taking the steps to eradicate the societal factors that contribute to eviction and homelessness I appreciate Desmond for keeping the spotlight on these families, for documenting how social injustice leads to individual suffering, and for publishing such an important book on an under discussed topic Please consider learning , volunteering, and or donating by checking out this website Desmond provides himself at the end of Evicted I feel glad that this book has received high praise and attention, so that we can lend support and compassion to those we may have once paid no attention flag 30 likesLike see review Kelli How did I not know you read this I ve not been on GR much since last June when our iPad vanished for the summer and beyond, except through the mob How did I not know you read this I ve not been on GR much since last June when our iPad vanished for the summer and beyond, except through the mobile app, which is terrible I have missed all of your reviews assumed you were too busy to read for pleasure Anyway, this was my favorite book of last year I was blown away Oct 15, 2017 09 21AM Feb 29, 2016 Ioana rated it it was amazing Shelves anthropology, oral history, non fiction, giveaways, arcs Evicted is a painstakingly researched ethnography of the housing crisis, told through the voices of members of two communities one black, one white a trailer park and project housing in Milwaukee I was deeply touched, enlightened, profoundly depressed, and humbled by this work Although I, as other Americans, are frequently exposed to statistics about poverty, these are but abstractions that only serve to reinforce the distance between the poor and the not we can just make our donation to Evicted is a painstakingly researched ethnography of the housing crisis, told through the voices of members of two communities one black, one white a trailer park and project housing in Milwaukee I was deeply touched, enlightened, profoundly depressed, and humbled by this work Although I, as other Americans, are frequently exposed to statistics about poverty, these are but abstractions that only serve to reinforce the distance between the poor and the not we can just make our donation to the Red Cross and feel like we ve done our part Unlike other academic books I ve read on the subject, Desmond paints an intimate portrait of daily toils, constant crisis mode, domestic violence, addiction, human dignity, familial and communal bonds, and other facets of poverty in relation to evictions, homelessness, sub standard housing By presenting a human focused perspective on poverty, Desmond s work adds depth to prior structural analyses, but importantly, challenges current arguments that demonize the poor i.e the poor are lazy not a statement I would have ever agreed with, but sadly, a common trope in current US political discourse.Chapters alternate between the trailer park and project housing, and include voices of both landlords and tenants, weaving a complex tapestry that is not limited by preconceptions i.e landlords are bad For the most part, Desmond tells these families stories, but there is also much to learn here for those of us not versed in the matter on housing policy in the US, and on the ways in which housing problems are inextricable from poverty Desmond makes a strong case that a stable home is or should be considered as a basic human right, for a home is the center of life, the wellspring of personhood , the place where civic life begins, allowing us to plant roots and take ownership over our community, participate in local politics and reach out to neighbors.I highly recommend this book to all Americans, especially those who have never experienced poverty For me, the revelations presented by Desmond were a powerful punch in the gut For the past 6 years, I was the only white person living in my section 8 development in DC I was provided a unit due to the teacher fire fighter police exemption I wanted to live in my school s neighborhood In retrospect, I deprived someone else of housing In retrospect, when I called the cops on the man beating his girlfriend in the apartment above me, I could have been responsible for their eviction In retrospect, I had virtually no clue about anything, because, outside of the roaches and rats and raccoons, the poverty didn t seep through my doorway I m now in the suburbs because a house here is about the same price as a closet in DC and wishing that I had read this, or had some clue, many years ago I won this book through the Goodreads Giveaways program and I am so very grateful that I did, because I don t think I would have made it a priority otherwise As it stands, this may be one of the most memorable and perspective altering books I ll read all year flag 33 likesLike see review View all 4 comments Aug 29, 2017 Book Riot Community added it This book won the Pulitzer, and the National Book Critics Circle Award, and I can absolutely see why Author Matthew Desmond spent months living in a trailer park and then an inner city rooming house in Milwaukee, getting to know the renters and their landlords and observing firsthand what the housing crisis looks like By telling these stories, he shows how hard it is for the poor to find and keep decent, affordable housing This book frequently infuriated me, but it also raised in me a strong This book won the Pulitzer, and the National Book Critics Circle Award, and I can absolutely see why Author Matthew Desmond spent months living in a trailer park and then an inner city rooming house in Milwaukee, getting to know the renters and their landlords and observing firsthand what the housing crisis looks like By telling these stories, he shows how hard it is for the poor to find and keep decent, affordable housing This book frequently infuriated me, but it also raised in me a strong sense of compassion for people who are struggling and a desire to look for opportunities to help and advocate for fairer housing policies It s an important book Teresa Prestonfrom The Best Books We Read In May 2017 flag 28 likesLike see review May 26, 2017 Jennifer Blankfein rated it it was amazing Visit for reviews and recommendations.Living paycheck to paycheck comes with ongoing pressures and struggles, but in Evicted Poverty and Profit in the American City, Matthew Desmond introduces us to the poorest of the poor, people lacking basic needs, food, clothing and shelter The downward spiral is devastating and our system offers little hope for getting ahead Simply stated, when tenants miss work to take care of their children, their pay is docked, an Visit for reviews and recommendations.Living paycheck to paycheck comes with ongoing pressures and struggles, but in Evicted Poverty and Profit in the American City, Matthew Desmond introduces us to the poorest of the poor, people lacking basic needs, food, clothing and shelter The downward spiral is devastating and our system offers little hope for getting ahead Simply stated, when tenants miss work to take care of their children, their pay is docked, and then, unable to afford food and ultimately rent, they get evicted From homeless shelters to other dilapidated hovels or trailor parks where the landlord refuses to put money into repairs because tenants are not paying the rent, these people, highest percentage of them black women with children, are constantly struggling as they are thrown out on the streets.In order to write this book, the author immersed himself into the life of poverty as a tenant in Milwaukee where he studies the trends eviction play in our society There are many contributors, government subsidized housing, food stamps, shelters, employement opportunities, education, drugs and crime, that all play a part in the successes and failures of the evicted.When speaking about the tenants Rent was their biggest expense by far, and they wanted a decent and functional home in return They wanted things to be fixed when they broke But if Sherenna wasn t going to repair her own property, neither were they The house failed the tenants and the tenants failed the house In regard to the nearly hopeless situation for moms with kids searching for housing In 1980 1 in 4 rental units was available to families without restrictions extra deposit and monthly surcharges per child Eight years later Congress finally outlawed housing discrimination against children and families, but the practice remained widespread Families with children were turned away in as many as 7 in 10 housing searches Bravo to Matthew Desmond for tackling this topic with tons of research This extraordinarily brutal and honest book is winner of the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction and is a must read in order to understand eviction, the toll it takes on tenants in the downward spiral of poverty, the landlords exploitation of the poor, and an economic system that is in desperate need of repair Desperation leads to drastic measures for both renters and landlords and our system has not done enough to provide realistic options to protect and nurture human life flag 33 likesLike see review View all 3 comments Nov 27, 2016 Jennifer rated it it was amazing Shelves audiobooks, non fiction, 2016 books An eye opening and powerful book about shockingly common practice of eviction in American cities Harvard sociologist Matthew Desmond spent months living in several different neighborhoods in Milwaukee s inner city This book focuses on a handful of people some white, some black, some single parents, some married with kids, some single who were all evicted during Desmond s time in the city Desmond gives readers an extraordinarily balanced, though bleak, view of the situations The landlor An eye opening and powerful book about shockingly common practice of eviction in American cities Harvard sociologist Matthew Desmond spent months living in several different neighborhoods in Milwaukee s inner city This book focuses on a handful of people some white, some black, some single parents, some married with kids, some single who were all evicted during Desmond s time in the city Desmond gives readers an extraordinarily balanced, though bleak, view of the situations The landlords are not completely slumlords, and the renters are not saints In that messy in between the reader will need to come to his or her own conclusions about what is just and what is unacceptable On a personal note, I will say that I listened to the majority of this book in the days after the 2016 Presidential Election This is a somber, sobering book The problems that exist seem enormous and intractable I was already feeling despondent and, as a result, this book deepened that funk While the topic in this book is incredibly important, I d recommend saving it for a time when one has the mental energy to give this book its full due flag 25 likesLike see review View all 4 comments Jun 09, 2017 Camie rated it it was amazing This book by Harvard sociologist Matthew Desmond , who moved into a low income trailer park in Milwaukee to live among those he would later write about, has won a Pulitzer Prize along with dozens of other awards It s rare that a non fiction book reads like a novel but Desmond does a terrific job here of keeping it readable though it s plenty real The number of people evicted from their homes and jolted into the serious upheaval of losing their possessions and their security is shocking at over This book by Harvard sociologist Matthew Desmond , who moved into a low income trailer park in Milwaukee to live among those he would later write about, has won a Pulitzer Prize along with dozens of other awards It s rare that a non fiction book reads like a novel but Desmond does a terrific job here of keeping it readable though it s plenty real The number of people evicted from their homes and jolted into the serious upheaval of losing their possessions and their security is shocking at over a million per year I had to read the statistics a few times to even fathom such high numbers The book should be read by everyone so we can be alerted to how broken the current welfare system is and how to some degree it effects us all Best of all , it offers possible solutions and it will make you want to be part of them, which can only be a good thing The Sunday Times said this is a monumental study which demands attention It sure got mine 5 stars flag 24 likesLike see review View all 4 comments Apr 13, 2017 JanB rated it it was amazing Shelves audiobook This is what poor looks like in America and it s not a pretty picture There s no question we have a flawed system, and the cycle continues with no way out for those who are caught up in poverty and substandard living conditions There are no heroes in this book, neither the tenants or the landlords There are situations that will break your heart, and situations that will infuriate you It s easy to judge the poor but unless we ve walked in their shoes I think we d do better to try and underst This is what poor looks like in America and it s not a pretty picture There s no question we have a flawed system, and the cycle continues with no way out for those who are caught up in poverty and substandard living conditions There are no heroes in this book, neither the tenants or the landlords There are situations that will break your heart, and situations that will infuriate you It s easy to judge the poor but unless we ve walked in their shoes I think we d do better to try and understand how and why it happens, and what we as a society can and should do to remedy the problem The poor that are described in these pages have no safety net, no mentor, and no family support It is literally impossible for them to escape No one escapes poverty alone The system is rigged against them, and, by far, the majority who end up evicted are women and children They don t always make wise choices But, still, even when I was angry or disgusted, I thought there but for the grace of God The author, who is a sociologist, not only did research for this book, he actually lived among them He didn t just interview them, he immersed himself in their lives I didn t learn this until the epilogue and I wish I had known that beforehand The epilogue was outstanding.Highly recommended It certainly opened my mind and my heart And that s why it gets 5 stars It should be required reading by everyone flag 24 likesLike see review View all 16 comments Feb 07, 2016 Caren rated it it was amazing Shelves adult nonfiction What an amazing book I was riveted by sociologist Matthew Desmond s experience with poor renters in Milwaukee Many times, while reading, I wondered how he had been able to collect such personal stories The answer to that question comes in the last chapter in which he lays out his research methods and the fact that he lived right alongside some of the poorest renters in the city, recording , with their permission, their lives The result is a book you won t forget I was reminded of the book I What an amazing book I was riveted by sociologist Matthew Desmond s experience with poor renters in Milwaukee Many times, while reading, I wondered how he had been able to collect such personal stories The answer to that question comes in the last chapter in which he lays out his research methods and the fact that he lived right alongside some of the poorest renters in the city, recording , with their permission, their lives The result is a book you won t forget I was reminded of the book I recently read, 2 a Day As in that book, stories of actual families illustrate the realities the lack of affordable housing presents for the poorest in our country Waiting lists for government housing or for help with rent are years long These very poor families end up in substandard housing often with stopped up sinks tubs toilets, no refrigerator or stove, and broken windows paying as much as 80% of their monthly income in rent When families are continually evicted and single mothers are most likely to be evicted , the kids are forced to change schools and jobs are hard to find and keep There is just a total lack of stability, with the evicted constantly in stress The author is a sociologist and urban ethnographer As an academic, he has chosen what seems to me the most effective way to present his case he allows readers inside the living situations of the poorest of the poor in the USA and allows them to judge for themselves He points out in his closing chapter that Milwaukee could just as easily be Indianapolis, Cincinnati, St Louis, or any other moderately sized city in the USA He chose Milwaukee because he was in grad school at the University of Wisconsin, so it was nearby He really befriended the families in question and, once again in the last chapter, shared his own situation, noting that his own family had lived in tight financial circumstances with his father being a pastor and his mother taking any sort of job she could find, yet losing their house during the recession It brought tears to my eyes when the author noted that any proceeds from the book would be shared with the families he profiled You know, you can talk the talk, but here is a guy who really walked with these people and tries to open the eyes of his fellow citizens to just what is going on in this country Along with the poor renters, he also profiles two landlords who are pretty ordinary people trying to make a living, but who are totally taking advantage of the situation poor people are in to make a pretty tidy income on their misfortune As an ethnographer, I found the author to be very even handed He isn t playing a blame game rather, he is showing us how it is, and asking us to care enough to seek change.My thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for a digital prepublication galley The book is due out March 1, 2016.Here is an excerpt is the author speaking about his book at the Politics and Prose Bookstore saw this thoughtful review in The Guardian and decided it needed to be shared.http www.theguardian.com books 2016 flag 22 likesLike see review View all 3 comments Jan 27, 2016 abby rated it it was amazing Shelves nonfiction, favorites This recently won the Pulitzer, and it s well deserved It s been a year since I read this, and it still sticks out in my mind as one of the best non fiction books I ve ever read.The one lesson I took away from this book above all else was that for everything I thought I knew about poverty in America, I actually knew very little.The rate of rent is becoming an epidemic, especially in low income areas, and evictions have added to a cycle of poverty that seems impossible to escape Having an evict This recently won the Pulitzer, and it s well deserved It s been a year since I read this, and it still sticks out in my mind as one of the best non fiction books I ve ever read.The one lesson I took away from this book above all else was that for everything I thought I knew about poverty in America, I actually knew very little.The rate of rent is becoming an epidemic, especially in low income areas, and evictions have added to a cycle of poverty that seems impossible to escape Having an eviction on your record limits the pool of landlords willing to rent to you, leaving you to the mercy of slumlords who charge above value rents for homes that often don t meet code Evictions tend to multiply like the dust bunnies under the bed once you have one, it s hard to avoid in the future.Author Matthew Desmond follows the plight of eight renting families and two landlords as they try to navigate through the Milwaukee housing jungle His writing is as compelling as the best work of fiction, and once you pick up Evicted, it s hard to put it back down It would have been easy for Desmond to take sides, to portray the renters as saints and the landlords as sinners, but he never loses his objectivity The example of a broken sink sums up the struggle between perspectives the tenants says the sink is broken the landlord says the tenant broke the sink.As a reader, I tried to remain objective as well, and failed quite a bit It was hard to read about the fire that tore through landlord Sharrena s property and killed an eight month old child The property didn t have working fire detectors, but Sherrena s concern was whether she d have to return that month s rent money to the grieving parents She asked a firefighter who assured her she did not It was hard to not to judge Lorraine, who was chronically late with her rent, but purchased a lobster dinner with food stamps and bought products off infomercials.And, of course, these types of judgments and emotions are part of what has made the housing crisis among the lowest of income groups possible This book makes its readers confront these biases.My only disappointment is that the epilogue didn t catch up with all the people Desmond wrote about and then dropped throughout the pages Instead, Desmond leaves us with his solution to this problem, which in my opinion would actually create an identical crisis among the lower middle class.I was able to view this title thanks to netgalley flag 20 likesLike see review View 1 comment Apr 25, 2016 Cher rated it liked it Shelves audiobook, bookclub, nonfiction 3 stars It was good.1 I never want to be a landlord 2 This country is in dire need of welfare reform The current wasteful and ineffective program merely enables and finances a vicious cycle of ignorance, desperation, poor decision making and dependency I resent being forced by my government to be a contributor to this asinine, failed system 3 That is all Favorite Quote If poverty persists in America, it is not for lack of resources.First Sente 3 stars It was good.1 I never want to be a landlord 2 This country is in dire need of welfare reform The current wasteful and ineffective program merely enables and finances a vicious cycle of ignorance, desperation, poor decision making and dependency I resent being forced by my government to be a contributor to this asinine, failed system 3 That is all Favorite Quote If poverty persists in America, it is not for lack of resources.First Sentence Jori and his cousin were cutting up, tossing snowballs at passing cars flag 19 likesLike see review View 1 comment Jun 16, 2017 Brandice rated it really liked it Evicted was a really great read both frustrating and fascinating There are 2 freedoms at odds with each other the freedom to profit from rents and the freedom to live in a safe and affordable home This is the overall theme of the book and a constant struggle, for all involved Decent, affordable housing should be a basic right for everybody in this country The reason is simple without stable shelter, everything else falls apart This statement was proven to be true by countless exampl Evicted was a really great read both frustrating and fascinating There are 2 freedoms at odds with each other the freedom to profit from rents and the freedom to live in a safe and affordable home This is the overall theme of the book and a constant struggle, for all involved Decent, affordable housing should be a basic right for everybody in this country The reason is simple without stable shelter, everything else falls apart This statement was proven to be true by countless examples shared throughout the book Reading about the constant discrimination faced by the tenants and the lack of ability for many of them to get ahead, and actually make progress to improve their living situation was tough and frustrating to read That said, I realize some of my views after reading Evicted may be unpopular, but I don t think the landlords referenced are all bad people for exercising their right to profit from property they own, and then taking legal action to evict tenants for failure to pay Being a landlord is a business first and foremost Did some of them lack compassion Absolutely Were they unkind Yes But one of them makes a valid point in the book, saying something along the lines of, you can t go into a grocery store, take food and not pay for it now or ever That s never been an option for anyone, anywhere The landlords should be required to fix broken plumbing and dilapidated structures without consequences for the tenant Nowhere should tenants have to choose between unsafe conditions of a shelter or being homeless Another story that stuck with me is the mother who participated in a robbery then had to ultimately face the consequences I don t doubt that the decision was driven by desperation, but the fact that it was desperation does not minimize its impact on the victims This quote perfectly sums up how I felt about her story when reading it I felt bad for her, for attempting to do something in order to provide for her family, yet also wanted her to be held accountable for robbing someone a stranger, who had no impact or influence on her particular situation, and was just a person going about her normal course of actions on a regular day This is also not ok The problems detailed in Evicted are not isolated or unique to Milwaukee Some cities have made greater strides to address housing challenges than others The author points out that what works somewhere, likely won t work everywhere Matthew Desmond offers a lot of interesting information throughout the book, but particularly in the epilogue I also liked how the book was written in third person, as an outside observer yet he was immersed in the subject directly flag 18 likesLike see review View 2 comments Dec 28, 2016 Kelly added it Shelves non fiction, read in 2016 Essential reading about poverty and the non stop cycle people find themselves in when they are evicted from the place they re living This really hit home, since it s set in Milwaukee, but Desmond does an excellent job making this a picture of everywhere in urban America His choice to go third person in his ethnography is, I think, what makes this book work so well this isn t his story and he in no way tells it like it is Instead, he gives voice to those who are so often voiceless and whose Essential reading about poverty and the non stop cycle people find themselves in when they are evicted from the place they re living This really hit home, since it s set in Milwaukee, but Desmond does an excellent job making this a picture of everywhere in urban America His choice to go third person in his ethnography is, I think, what makes this book work so well this isn t his story and he in no way tells it like it is Instead, he gives voice to those who are so often voiceless and whose stories are seen as part of the problem in America, rather than a result of the bigger, structural problems that actively work against their desires to reach their biggest potential Anyone who works in public services should be required to read this, especially those who work in places like libraries Not because it s the kind of book that asks libraries to provide things, but rather, because it s the kind of books that asks people like librarians to maybe pause the Things and focus on the people who depend upon them I m going to be thinking about this one for a long, long time flag 17 likesLike see review Mar 01, 2016 Nancy Oakes rated it it was amazing Shelves nonfiction I have only limited time for the next week plus, so much to come about this book after I get home The very short version is that it is painstakingly researched, sad, eye opening and very well written Whatever you do, do not miss the endnotes go the extra mile and read through them This book deserves major accolades, awards, and should be read by everyone, most especially government officials from the city level on up Just effing brilliant flag 16 likesLike see review View 2 comments previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next new topicDiscuss This Book topics posts views last activity Charlotte Mecklen Did you hear Dr Desmond speak at Spirit Square 1 5 Oct 02, 2017 04 48PM The Social Just Eviction Discussion September 22, 2017 1 2 Sep 22, 2017 08 20AM The Social Just Lets Discuss 1 1 Sep 22, 2017 08 17AM The Social Just Event Reminders for Evicted 1 2 Sep 14, 2017 06 50AM The Social Just Evicted in NC Discussion Guide 1 1 Sep 14, 2017 06 40AM The Social Just Join us tomorrow at noon for a Facebook Live discussion 3 5 Sep 08, 2017 06 44AM More topics Share Recommend It Stats Recent Status Updates Readers Also Enjoyed.



Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond Reviews

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond
Jennifer Masterson

This just won The Pulitzer Yay Evicted Poverty and Profit in the American City is probably the most important book that I have ever read If you are to read one non fiction book this year it should probably be this book This should be required reading in high school I learned about poverty and poor renters, the eviction process, and scumbag landlords.This book is about 8 families in Milwaukee These are both Caucasian and African American families The book is broken down into 3 parts

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond
Roxane

The brutal truth of poverty in America is far devastating than any fiction ever could be In evicted, Matthew Desmond brings rigorous sociological research and ethnography to Milwaukee s inner city This book is painful and necessary and eye opening I am ashamed of how little I knew about poverty and eviction This book is fucking depressing and hopeless and excellent We have got to do better Also the segregation And racist ass Ned who made his biracial stepdaughters say white power w

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond
Stephanie

5 stars Eye opening and heartbreaking account of the plight of renters living below the poverty line

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond
Carol.

It is no surprise that Evicted was the University Wisconsin Madison s

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond
Kelli

Whatever our way out of this mess, one thing is certain This degree of inequality, this withdrawal of opportunity, this cold denial of basic needs, this endorsement of pointless suffering by no American value is this situation justified No moral code or ethical principle, no piece of scripture or holy teaching, can be summoned to defend what we have allowed our country to become I begin this review with what is essentially the end of this book There is another piece after this that will hav

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond
Diane

Wow, this is a powerful look at what it means to be poor in America The book follows eight families in the Milwaukee area, all facing eviction problems Some of the families are white, some are black, some have children All of them struggled to pay the monthly rent, which seemed ridiculously high for the broken down places they got Families have watched their incomes stagnate, or even fall, while their housing costs have soared Today, the majority of poor renting families in America spend ov

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond
Kelly (and the Book Boar)

Find all of my reviews at

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond
Christy

1 28 17 UPDATE Author Roxane Gay was asked what was the last book that made you furious She said Evicted, by Matthew Desmond My God, what that book lays bare about American poverty It is devastating and infuriating and a necessary read Yep I continue to think this book says oodles than

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond
Shelby *trains flying monkeys*

This is definitely not Good Times

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond
Dianne

What A Goat Rodeo.Super interesting and frustrating and appalling and unbelievable and believable and terrifying and infuriating and heartbreaking andwell, you get the idea The first part of this Pulitzer Prize winning book brings together a handful of characters landlords and tenants in a poor Milwaukee neighborhood and tells their stories what brought them to where they are, what keeps them stuck in poverty, what options if any they have Desmond does a really good job of choos

thumbnail Title: Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond
Author:Matthew Desmond
ISBN :
ranting: 3.5
Reviewer: 3279 Reviews
Description: From Harvard sociologist and MacArthur Genius Matthew Desmond, a landmark work of scholarship and reportage that will forever change the way we look at poverty in America In this brilliant, he

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