TunesKit Spotify Converter v1 0 0 20-DVT | Baywatch Los vigilantes de la playa (2017) SPANISH 1080p BluRay Rip XviD | 0 Comments
  • Title : Living on Paper

  • Author:

  • Ranting:

  • ISBN: 0701187050

  • Number of Pages: 686 pages


Living on Paper Description

Here, for the first time, is Iris Murdoch s life in her own words, from her schoolgirl days to her last years.The letters show a great mind at work we see the young Murdoch struggling with philosophical issues and witness her anguish when a novel won t come together As well as her sharp sense of humour and irreverence, they also reveal her personal life, the subject of Here, for the first time, is Iris Murdoch s life in her own words, from her schoolgirl days to her last years.The letters show a great mind at work we see the young Murdoch struggling with philosophical issues and witness her anguish when a novel won t come together As well as her sharp sense of humour and irreverence, they also reveal her personal life, the subject of much speculation, in all its complexity her emotional hunger and her tendency to live on the edge of what was socially acceptable We see how this fed into her novels plots and characters, despite her claims that her fiction was not drawn from reality.These letters bring us closer than ever before to Iris Murdoch as a person They make for an extraordinary and intimate reading experience she is wonderful company Get A CopyKindle Store Online StoresAudibleBarnes NobleKoboApple iBooksGoogle PlayAbebooksBook DepositoryIndigoHalf.comAlibrisBetter World BooksIndieBoundLibraries Or buy for Hardcover, 686 pages Published November 5th 2015 by Chatto Windus More Details ISBN 0701187050 ISBN13 9780701187057 Edition Language English Other Editions 6 All Editions Add a New Edition Combine Less Detail edit details Friend Reviews To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up Reader QA To ask other readers questions about Living on Paper, please sign up

Be the first to ask a question about Living on Paper

Lists with This Book The Soul s Possession Forthcoming for 2015 60 books 46 voters Best Non Fiction Books 252 books 37 voters More lists with this book Community Reviews showing 1 30 filter sort default Rating Details 0 copy ratingGraph.clone j rating_details_tip_graph.remove copy.attr id , rating_details_tip_graph copy.find script.remove j rating_details_tip.prepend copy Nov 16, 2015 Bettie rated it really liked it Recommends it for BBC Radio Listeners Shelves epistolatory diary blog, nonfiction, radio 4, published 2015, autumn 2015, nonfic nov 2015 BOTWhttp www.bbc.co.uk programmes b06pssb5Description Throughout her life, Iris Murdoch wrote thousands of letters Mostly to friends and lovers Iris Murdoch was born in Dublin in 1919 to Hughes and Rene Murdoch While still a baby the family moved to west London In 1938, Murdoch won a place at Somerville College, Oxford, where she read classics After gaining her first class degree, wartime work in the Treasury ensued before, in 1944, she joined the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation BOTWhttp www.bbc.co.uk programmes b06pssb5Description Throughout her life, Iris Murdoch wrote thousands of letters Mostly to friends and lovers Iris Murdoch was born in Dublin in 1919 to Hughes and Rene Murdoch While still a baby the family moved to west London In 1938, Murdoch won a place at Somerville College, Oxford, where she read classics After gaining her first class degree, wartime work in the Treasury ensued before, in 1944, she joined the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration and was posted to Belgium and Austria, where she worked helping those displaced by the war.Murdoch left UNRRA in 1946 and, after a year s postgraduate studies at Newnham College, Cambridge, was appointed as a philosophy tutor at At Anne s College, Oxford In 1954, while still at St Anne s, Murdoch debut novel Under The Net was published.In a writing career that spanned over 40 years, Murdoch published 26 novels, five books on philosophy, six plays and two books of poetry Her novel The Sea, The Sea won the 1978 Booker Prize and, in 1987, she was made a Dame She remains one of the most celebrated British novelists of the 20th century.1 This episode focuses on her years as an Oxford undergraduate when she was full of hope and political idealism.2 In this episode, which embraces the years 1942 1944 when Murdoch was working at the Treasury, the letters to her Oxford friend, Frank Thompson, are particularly poignant.3 Iris Murdoch had not seen David Hicks since 1938 when they were both at Oxford, but she continued to write until, in November 1945, they finally met up again This time in London and with dramatic consequences.4 For 30 years, the French writer Raymond Queneau and Iris Murdoch exchanged letters The Frenchman was her muse and, in Murdoch s chaotic private life, perhaps the one constant.5 Iris Murdoch and Brigid Brophy had an intimate friendship for many years, but Murdoch s letters reveal how volatile the relationship could be Frank Thompson is better known in Britain as brother of the historian EP Thompson, but in Bulgaria he is a national hero Attached during the second world war to Special Operations Executive SOE , he was parachuted into the Balkans to work with Bulgarian partisans after two weeks of eating salted leaves and live wood snails, he was captured, tortured and murdered by the Nazis SourceRaymond Queneau a French novelist, poet, and co founder of Oulipo Ouvroir de litt rature potentielle , notable for his wit and cynical humour.The music used on this programme is Near Light by lafur Arnalds flag 14 likesLike see review View 1 comment Oct 22, 2015 Antonomasia marked it as to read Recommended to Antonomasia by Shelves lgbtq un At last Ever since the Iris biopic was released, I ve wanted to read about Murdoch in her own words, and bemoaned the absence of a memoir so often that it was getting boring Letters will do very, very nicely instead flag 9 likesLike see review Oct 27, 2015 Stephen P rated it did not like it Shelves letters, can t take it any I m not finished but I am done I m de flittered I went into a room locked the door and covered the windows so I could illegally peek ahead More of her social and love life flitting from one to the other When in her letters she does mention what I was seeking, her brilliant mind battling with philosophic and academic issues When it occurred it was simply a brief reporting A huge disappointment Maybe I ll read the A.S Byatt Bio on her flag 10 likesLike see review View all 6 comments Oct 24, 2016 Corey rated it it was amazing review of another edition I ve been reading Iris Murdoch s letters for 7 months, a few pages at a time There s a reason she is my favorite novelist and you can find hints at why in her correspondence, though she doesn t talk much about her own books Instead, her letters are full of love, requited and not, friendship, faith, politics, philosophy, intellect and passion I feel like I ve lived with her for most of this year and I m sorry now to leave her behind flag 6 likesLike see review Nov 17, 2015 Laura rated it really liked it Recommended to Laura by Bettie Shelves memoir biography, audio books, non fiction, irish literature, read 2015 From BBC Radio 4 Book of the Week Throughout her life, Iris Murdoch wrote thousands of letters Mostly to friends and lovers This episode focuses on her years as an Oxford undergraduate when she was full of hope and political idealism.2 5 In this episode, which embraces the years 1942 1944 when Murdoch was working at the Treasury, the letters to her Oxford friend, Frank Thompson, are particularly poignant.3 5 Iris Murdoch had not seen David Hicks since 1938 when they were both at Oxford, bu From BBC Radio 4 Book of the Week Throughout her life, Iris Murdoch wrote thousands of letters Mostly to friends and lovers This episode focuses on her years as an Oxford undergraduate when she was full of hope and political idealism.2 5 In this episode, which embraces the years 1942 1944 when Murdoch was working at the Treasury, the letters to her Oxford friend, Frank Thompson, are particularly poignant.3 5 Iris Murdoch had not seen David Hicks since 1938 when they were both at Oxford, but she continued to write until, in November 1945, they finally met up again This time in London and with dramatic consequences.4 5 For 30 years, the French writer Raymond Queneau and Iris Murdoch exchanged letters The Frenchman was her muse and, in Murdoch s chaotic private life, perhaps the one constant.5 5 Iris Murdoch and Brigid Brophy had an intimate friendship for many years, but Murdoch s letters reveal how volatile the relationship could be.Iris Murdoch was born in Dublin in 1919 to Hughes and Rene Murdoch While still a baby the family moved to west London In 1938, Murdoch won a place at Somerville College, Oxford, where she read classics After gaining her first class degree, wartime work in the Treasury ensued before, in 1944, she joined the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration and was posted to Belgium and Austria, where she worked helping those displaced by the war.Murdoch left UNRRA in 1946 and, after a year s postgraduate studies at Newnham College, Cambridge, was appointed as a philosophy tutor at At Anne s College, Oxford In 1954, while still at St Anne s, Murdoch debut novel Under The Net was published.In a writing career that spanned over 40 years, Murdoch published 26 novels, five books on philosophy, six plays and two books of poetry Her novel The Sea, The Sea won the 1978 Booker Prize and, in 1987, she was made a Dame She remains one of the most celebrated British novelists of the 20th century.The music used on this programme is Near Light by lafur ArnaldsLiving On Paper Letters From Iris Murdoch 1935 1995Editors Avril Horner and Anne RoweReaders Imogen Stubbs and Nigel AnthonyAbridger Pete NicholsProducer Karen RoseA Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.http www.bbc.co.uk programmes b06pssb5 flag 5 likesLike see review View all 5 comments Mar 04, 2017 James Klagge rated it liked it review of another edition Shelves academia, letters The fact that I finished a 600 page book in a few weeks indicates I found it interesting On the other hand I marked in pencil passages that I found, well, noteworthy, and there were only about 3 dozen, which is only about 1 every 17 pages Nevertheless, the letters were quite readable I would have edited it much severely, but I can imagine others found things interesting that I didn t Murdoch is interesting to me because she was both a philosopher and a novelist Her philosophical views The fact that I finished a 600 page book in a few weeks indicates I found it interesting On the other hand I marked in pencil passages that I found, well, noteworthy, and there were only about 3 dozen, which is only about 1 every 17 pages Nevertheless, the letters were quite readable I would have edited it much severely, but I can imagine others found things interesting that I didn t Murdoch is interesting to me because she was both a philosopher and a novelist Her philosophical views mostly from the 50 s through the 70 s were somewhat influential I especially liked her little book The Sovereignty of Good Yet she felt very unconfident, disclaiming pp 395 489 I am not a philosopher But later in her life p 571 she calls philosophy a sort of addiction for her She was an extraordinarily productive novelist, publishing 26 novels over 40 years I have read just two of her novels I especially liked Under the Net, and somewhat liked A Fairly Honourable Defeat Murdoch was one odd bird, at least in her personal life She was bi sexual, carrying on multiple seemingly physical relationships with both sexes at the same time, sometimes through a couple decades, with people as much as 20 years younger or older than she was At least on the evidence of these letters I haven t read her biography she was very faithful to these people and to her husband over decades as a friend as well In the mid 60 s she characterized herself three times pp 293, 304 347 as a male homosexual in the guise of a female, whatever that means Perhaps the most positive spin on her polyamory is what she wrote p 347 I can t divide friendship from love or love from sex or sex from love, etc And she had quite a healthy appetite for friendship While she must have met a large number of famous people, she doesn t write much about them She has a nice description of Sartre p 35 , and while she liked Derrida as a person pp 511 12 she despised his views pp 511 12 573 and refused to consider him a philosopher She met Wittgenstein twice briefly, but there was nothing about those meetings here, unfortunately Scattered throughout the letters are striking obiter dicta 1967, p 337 I think the Beatles ought to be jointly Poet Laureate This gives her the distinction of suggesting a literary prize be given to musicians almost 50 years before the Nobel Committee got around to the same idea 1988, p 548 revolting women s studies Oxford now has a ghastly women s studies major 1988, p 550 Of course schoolchildren should never be allowed to come near philosophy The one thing that gave me a person connection to the letters was her correspondence with Philippa Foot, whom I knew as a professor during my graduate studies at UCLA Murdoch twice reprimands her pp 363 376 for writing illegibly in her letters, and even the address I can identify with this, as comments that Foot wrote on seminar papers were in fact routinely illegible flag 3 likesLike see review Feb 03, 2016 James Murphy rated it it was amazing review of another edition I think Iris Murdoch one of the most interesting and learned writers of our time I ve read only a handful of the novels and some of the philosophy These letters inspire me to become involved with her novels which, we re told, are powered by her philosophic ideas.I didn t get a sense of her deep intellectual currents from the letters Almost all of them are personal rather than concerned with her writing or teaching Because she cared deeply for those she corresponded with, they re af I think Iris Murdoch one of the most interesting and learned writers of our time I ve read only a handful of the novels and some of the philosophy These letters inspire me to become involved with her novels which, we re told, are powered by her philosophic ideas.I didn t get a sense of her deep intellectual currents from the letters Almost all of them are personal rather than concerned with her writing or teaching Because she cared deeply for those she corresponded with, they re affectionate and newsy than informative about her professional life Strongly influenced by Simone Weil and Plato, for instance, she thought Good a real moral force in the world and the moral life a realistic goal Her fiction, novels often about good and evil, carry the same ideas as her philosophic thought.These appraisals of her beliefs and character, however, are hidden deep in the letters For the most part they offer little insight into her fiction or philosophy I think they stand too much alone, without enough accompanying explanation of how they directly relate to Murdoch as a person, novelist, and teacher I came away with a sense of what a fine, loving person she was, and I enjoyed the letters for that, especially since so many of them are love letters There is some repetitiveness, though And I thought I didn t learn enough about Murdoch the novelist and philosopher flag 3 likesLike see review Jul 20, 2016 Stephen Brody rated it really liked it Some subtlety can be so voluptuous I am so sorry I went to sleep How charming of you to attribute it to drink One should rest Potter around Admire one s Chinese plates Much love, Iris.I m not quite sure I approve of this habit of publishing the letters of people who have achieved fame from writing other things but are no longer here to defend themselves against misinterpretation or criticisms of their private lives from others whose own behaviour might not always bear too much simi Some subtlety can be so voluptuous I am so sorry I went to sleep How charming of you to attribute it to drink One should rest Potter around Admire one s Chinese plates Much love, Iris.I m not quite sure I approve of this habit of publishing the letters of people who have achieved fame from writing other things but are no longer here to defend themselves against misinterpretation or criticisms of their private lives from others whose own behaviour might not always bear too much similar scrutiny, even when as with Virginia Woolf s the letters were intended to be preserved It s far too profitable an industry for publishers and editors , rather unpleasantly parasitic in other words There s a stern instruction in one letter from Iris Murdoch to a close friend Destroy this and all letters And keep your mouth shut an instruction evidently not carried out On the other hand nor can I resist pouring over some of these collections, and that of Murdoch s letters was of course irresistible because although I was an avid reader throughout almost all her literary life of everything she produced as soon as it appeared she herself remained an impenetrable mystery high minded moralist or mocking joker, the ultimate ivory tower dweller or worldly sophisticate, blue stocking or flapper, or even possibly just a very clever lunatic A rare television appearance sometime in the eighties only deepened the mystery a quite ordinary looking woman with a pudding basin haircut speaking in perfectly assured and cadenced grave sentences with the voice of complete authority She d waived away the taxi sent for her and set off into the London drizzle afterwards in a shabby old raincoat This book starts to disclose the human being behind the enigma.One doesn t always realise the extent of one s good fortune until well on in life Part of mine, I see now, was to have been taken up as hardly than a raw boy by a few people from the generation before mine, that born in the period between the two Wars, and how can the peculiar tone of that possibly be described to a younger one which appears to bear absolutely no relation to it, or indeed dismisses it entirely Although Murdoch of course only became known in the late 1950 s and continued for another forty years, nonetheless she carried with her exactly the imprint of her early background and education, apparently largely impervious to subsequent influences though nor was she unaware of them, sometimes gently exasperated by the importunities and emotional sufferings of others while passing with only the lightest touch over her own It s a great delight to resurrect that sort of understated throw away half gossipy English style, brittle but sometimes with deadly effect, now completely vanished, where even the War was a rather jolly occasion, the sort of things that so beset and deeply worry us now shrugged off as a bore, things of the utmost trivia raised to melodrama and perfectly outrageous behaviour was a matter of course and the subject of much amusement As in this 1943 Mitford ish example, so frivolously and tactfully propos, to a male friend stranded facing the German tanks somewhere in the deserts of the Middle East Darling the mice have been eating your letters I am very angry about this, chiefly because your letters are rather precious documents, but also because I am not on very good terms with the mice, and the fact that I have been careless enough to leave valuables lying around where they could get at them can be chalked up as a point to them One day I shall declare serious war on the mice in a combined trap poison operation At present I am just sentimental with a fringe of annoyance I meet them every now and then, on the stairs or underneath the gas stove, and they have such nice long tails There was also, amongst the intellectual classes with their customary naivety, a great deal of intensity over the improvement of the human lot conscientious young men rushed off in proletarian gear to interfere futilely in Spain s internal affairs while their female counterparts in rational clothing forget them immediately in their adulation of the heroes of Stalin s brave new world As a young under graduate Murdoch joined into all that with all appropriate enthusiasm while voraciously reading a staggering quantity of books of every sort and acquiring with apparent ease a knowledge of several languages The communism , naturally, was short lived because she d actually read the 19th cent Russians who understood these things far better By the age of twenty seven she wrote that I wish I could be Christian There is such worth there and values which are real to one Values and religion remained central themes in all her writing, both philosophical and fictional, for the rest of her life by religion, it should go without saying, she didn t mean going to church on Sundays Later, she grew to hate as she said the Labour Party for its deliberate erosion of the past, and the Communists for their insistence on a mindless uniformity and ugliness The Party, like the medieval church, has its tentacles right down into the remotest corners One thing is decidedly clear from these letters, Murdoch was anything but a nun, although nuns appear in a very rosy light in one or two of the novels and in Nuns and Soldiers she could have been describing herself, or an aspect of herself, in the person of Anne Cavidge who relinquishes a vivacious and popular life to enter a convent to ensure a clear conscience, discovering only later what a restrictive bore in high falutin language of course that can be In her time her love affairs bordered on the scandalous, and would have crossed that border had she been less adept in keeping her right hand in ignorance of the left She was, in fact, quite a heart breaker, even a femme fatale, through her rejection of possessiveness and espousal of what is now called polyamory she herself referred to her own nemisism, an inescapable agent of someone else s downfall as in the character of Anna Quentin in Under the Net, the first novel her existence is one long act of disloyalty constantly involved in secrecy and lying to conceal from each of her friends that she was so closely bound to all the others As a young woman she was drawn towards somewhat gloomy sounding rumple suited and be spectacled pipe smokers older or much older than herself We won t say anything so silly as a father fixation Murdoch didn t care for ideas of therapeutic causality Of course mechanics and psychoanalysis can offer us some useful generalities about ourselves But every thing that is important and valuable and good belongs to that little piece of us which is not mechanical and no one who is not bemused by philosophy or a youthful mood really doubts the existence of this piece Various other ladies, not all of them entirely benign, were passing figures of attraction too, even if platonically Dearest Queen of the Night It means nothing to say that her romantic choices seem very odd when most people s romantic choices are fairly incomprehensible to anyone else the single apparently most un rumpled man, Raymond Queneau, remained studiously out of reach in spite of a cap being thrown repeatedly at him if your letters to me could be slightly less impersonal I should be glad Elias Cannetti, unattractive in photographs, was all too available, exercising what sounds like a decidedly unwholesome influence on the impressionable Miss Murdoch this rather sinister figure is alluded to in The Flight from the Enchanter and probably elsewhere All was grist to the literary mill, just about every human aberration appears somewhere or other in her novels and there s no doubt she knew what she was talking about there s nothing like diversity and variety in these matters for learning all about the best and worst of human nature It was perhaps inevitable that this dangerous woman should finally marry the dullest of them all his chief drawback is tendency to mope like a dog in kennels when I am not there and whose chief virtue, perhaps, was that he hadn t the imagination to cause trouble I doubt that she was a woman who would seriously have wanted competition in any matrimonial setting I am a homosexual in female guise, which puts me of course in a rather difficult position , as she observed than once, how tongue in cheek it s difficult to say By her late forties Iris Murdoch s reputation was so well established that she admits to often being exhausted from a gruelling round of professional commitments lectures, public speaking not only at home but around the globe, at a stage turning out another novel every year that the letters because her sociable relations did not diminish become noticeably cursory or even slightly impatient, though without any other change of tone Her energy was extraordinary, and of course, as word processors had yet to be invented and she would have turned down that aid even if they had, everything was written by hand She noticed that the world was changing, as it always is, and although for a while sympathetic to a new form of rebelliousness in the young, deplored most of it This was particularly true in education, always her special field as a teacher at Oxford it is very unfair on clever or even cleverish people not only to be forced by fashion and the few to spend time in some form of agitation but also and this is what really gets me to enjoy its fruits in terms of popular teachers and easy courses Of course young people will choose what s easier, that their yet unexpanded imaginations and sensibilities can deal with But the expansion is education, and that is what hurts Yes, I am stern and sadistic towards the young, and this is what makes me a jolly good teacher She might have despaired had she known to what extent a student protest of the time over dry academic courses was going to lead to a virtual elimination of a genuine education in the best sense It s somewhere here that I still have a little puzzlement about Iris Murdoch The Nice and the Good was the title of one of her cleverer novels That the characters were not very good at all just adds a piquancy to the story She herself was as nice and as good as anyone can hope for, along with being formidably intelligent, an extraordinarily rare combination Did she ever quite realize how rare, that most of the human race is not particularly any of those things Love will sort everything out, she seems to be saying Will it for the unlovable Her affection for those she knew was, no doubt, returned, but although she knew a lot of people they were almost exclusively academically inclined and civilised and good manners were a necessary attribute a lapse in that direction was properly reproved You have sent me a very wolfish letter full of hostility Do not bite me in this hasty way And don t put me into lists I deserve paragraphs and poems to myself She wrote to someone else I lived in a universe of perfect harmony until I was thirteen and went to boarding school and found out that the world was not composed purely of love but it was too late by then Even her characters meant, according to some critics, to be or less the very embodiment of wickedness don t seem terribly awful if anything, it s the tormentedly self questioning socially conscious ones who are suspect for their blindness and hypocrisy There s one delinquent and devious youth in Henry and Cato who complains to a would be benefactor, an aspirant priest, that you don t understand ordinary folks don t understand because the benefactor is guiltily in love with him and conceals that under a cover of altruism of which this mauvais gar on is very well aware and exploits In front of an image of a crucified Christ, he observes with down to earth morality it s a terrible thing to look at if you think of it, the nails and all that blood If a gang done that they d get ten years, even if the bugger survived In the novels almost everyone is almost permanently in a well bred muddle, that s part of their appeal because intentionally or not it s often so comical and because their creator was such a superlative story teller in her philosophical writings there s a sort of vagueness about that part of the world which is not well bred at all, where evil is rather conventionally summed up by totalitarianism and refugees with whom Murdoch worked after the War and, later, environmental issues and so on, failings of attention to use one of her favoured expressions rather than of motivation There are all kinds of hard fates in the world, but all kinds of graces and alleviations come unexpectedly when one has entered into them Actually, her views on current affairs , predictably liberal ish, often seem peculiarly superficial and unreflective, as if she were agreeably accommodating to those of her correspondents rather than really caring or taking too much notice on her own account She gave her approval to Margaret Thatcher and Indira Gandhi with whom she d been at school and continued occasionally to correspond with , yet there s no comment on the latter s sensationally gruesome end nor any apparent observation that both ladies were regarded by many as veritable monsters Perhaps it was that she held the view that good and evil are not just always present in an unalterable balance but that each is necessary for the other I m not remotely denigrating Murdoch s profound wisdom and talent, indeed reverential admiration and the greatest delight in everything she wrote is quite undimmed after this book, it s just that she wasn t for nothing the greatest proponent in our times of a genuinely aristocratic Platonism and had no truck with kitchen sink literature such tosh rather oddly she had no liking either for Flaubert and only reservedly for George Elliot, her favourite writers were Dickens and Proust and Dostoievsky There was a genuine sympathy for the underdog but not a preference for his company Perhaps that had something to do with her aversion to anything psychological , but perhaps it also accounts for why many novel readers find her incomprehensible or even insufferable judging by some of the comments in places like this though accurately and meticulously observed and drawn the characters could seem to bear little relation to anyone one knows, usually without visible means of support but quite untroubled by financial embarrassments or practical domestic irritations, breaking even if they re rather stupid into improbably intellectual dialogues at the drop of a hat, usually existing or claiming to in a state of high moral consciousness whether they live up to it or not and in sharp contrast to such other great writers as Proust or Balzac or George Elliot or Marguerite Yourcenar for example, whose characters are almost alarmingly recognizable and have a sort of extra hard fierceness and realism about them Murdoch herself offers a very insightful observation, that the main difficulty for the novelist is to keep a balance between real people and images the main difficulty for herself she must have meant, since all novelists of this calibre are unique Philosophy of course, or Murdoch s brilliantly inspiring variety of musings on how to be good without god and in which she was equally prolific even though she says than once that philosophy is too difficult for her, deals only in imagery, and the real difficulty since no other person has equally combined the two interests so formidably is that they don t exactly mix though it could as well be asked, what is a novel anyway, or what is philosophy come to that A certain perplexity arises from the suspicion that although Murdoch had a strong sense of humour she had little or no sense of irony any than she had even if sounds rather rude to say it much of a sense of good taste in material objects , never developing in that respect beyond a conventional school girl Or perhaps just a reluctance to use those if one likes frivolous senses for reasons of preserving another one she very much disliked cruelty and it would be tempting to say that she wilfully preserved a sort of innocence which is Oriental that ordinarily Western she knew a lot about Oriental religions and was much taken with them Amusing or not according to taste, her characterizations are in no way satirical or in jest, they are vehicles for exploring moral dilemmas or even abstractions dilemmas to which the baser and greater part of humanity pays little or no heed Since her death these disparities have become even pronounced, the last remnants of the world she inhabited so little time ago no longer existing A pity, since as she said the Socratic Dialogues were not intended to provide answers but to induce thought about the questions, and Plato in spite of himself was one of the few great poets There are very charming qualities in these letters They re unfailingly kind and tactfully polite compassionate and understanding to use currently over worked and therefore largely degraded language while not conceding an inch in false flattery or compromise of principles, nor above gently chiding the correspondent for lack of the same To the often tiresomely exigent and generally second rate Brigid Brophy To hell with these bloody metaphors I am not a great writer Neither are you I have never of course really told you what I think of your work, though what I have said is truthful In fact I don t think critically in detail about what you write I love it as an emanation of you and admire what is patently admirable in it Or as an aside to a young admirer and temporary paramour to whom she d been generous in reply to a gushy thank you note That meal was lunch by the way We are not U enough to call it luncheon By never picking quarrels and giving her friends the benefit of the doubt she kept most of them for most of her life or theirs Also, the letters are very attractively self effacing, in good form , the casual reader would never know that the writer was so eminent and famous there s an occasional passing reference to feeling a bit drained after finishing another book, nothing else, no discussion of them or any fishing for praise and a deliberate repulsion of any attempts at interpretation I wonder if her friends actually read her books or liked them if they did Above all is the sparkling sense of immediacy, that they re just hastily written conversations, not composed for the record Reading them it s not so difficult to believe that writing novels than any other author caused her no great difficulty, they d already been completely worked out in her head in the course of doing other things so that putting the words down was nothing than taking dictation, and that s a truly phenomenal talent Presumably these letters would be of little or no interest to other than Murdoch admirers already conversant with her work yet in them we see her practising what she preached, a rare accomplishment in itself and from which there are many lessons to be learned by everyone Regrettably, I fear insofar as she s remembered at all in the wider public consciousness, thanks to the self seeking diligence of memoirists and film makers, it s as a helpless and rambling old woman and it can only be hoped that her shade finally sees the irony of that flag 1 likeLike see review Jul 30, 2017 Jonathan rated it it was amazing Shelves letters The editors of this collection of Iris Murdoch s letters have done a good job in selecting ones which add to the biographical detail which is available in other books The connections she made to friends, lovers, and colleagues are given extra depth with her own words, along with the odd letter to politicians and The Times, showing how concerned she was with other matters outside her own sphere of teaching, writing and the life of an academic in general The overriding impression from them all i The editors of this collection of Iris Murdoch s letters have done a good job in selecting ones which add to the biographical detail which is available in other books The connections she made to friends, lovers, and colleagues are given extra depth with her own words, along with the odd letter to politicians and The Times, showing how concerned she was with other matters outside her own sphere of teaching, writing and the life of an academic in general The overriding impression from them all is one of a woman who cared deeply Her concern for others is almost overwhelming at times,and although there are ways in which their complicated lives could be seen to feed into the pages of her novels, as she says in one of the letters, her characters are not based on real people but are the result of the use of her imagination Towards the end there are indications of how Alzheimer s was affecting her memory and abilities, and this makes for sad reading, but overall the book is evidence of a strong, amazing writer who had a real joy for life and people.In 1994 I was lucky enough to meet Iris Murdoch when I worked at Blackwell s in Oxford and we provided a bookstall at one of her last public engagements at St Anne s College Listening to her speak and sing as she was wont to do on occasion , would have been enough, but luckily during the break I was able to ask her to sign a copy of her novel A Message To the Planet for me She was without a doubt one of the sweetest, nicest authors I have met, and I will always treasure this moment, and remember the smile she gave me, seeing a young bookseller who read her novels, at a time when this book shows she had doubts over her contribution to the literary world Of course I will carry on recommending them, including this one to anyone who wants an intelligent, well observed novel or insight into the life of a writer flag Like see review Feb 10, 2016 Eileen Hall rated it really liked it Although I was not really a fan of her work, this collection of letters show a different side to the person I imagined.They are informative and telling.She came over as funny, intelligent and loving.I was given a digital copy of this book by the publisher Princeton University Press via Netgalley in return for an honest unbiased review flag Like see review Nov 10, 2016 Shannon is currently reading it Shelves hibernating I m going to have to set this book to hibernating until I can buy my own copy of it It is intriguing and I adore Iris Murdoch but I can t just sit and read 600 or so pages of letters all at once flag Like see review Nov 25, 2015 Cathy Beyers rated it really liked it I liked this, but boy it took me a long time to read Since I am a fan of Murdoch s work, this gave me a much better insight in to her thoughts and feelings Good for fans with a lot of time on their hands flag Like see review Feb 29, 2016 Katrina rated it really liked it Brilliantly edited, insightful re Murdoch s inner life I had no idea she wrote poetry You may wish not to know about the slide in her political views A great read flag Like see review Doris rated it really liked it Mar 23, 2017 Ralph Hannon rated it it was amazing Oct 08, 2016 Michelle rated it it was amazing May 03, 2016 Sean rated it liked it Apr 14, 2016 Rebecca rated it really liked it Dec 09, 2015 Ms Voodoo rated it liked it Mar 10, 2016 Angie rated it liked it Nov 22, 2015 Tea2 rated it really liked it Aug 02, 2016 Austin Hackney rated it it was amazing Jan 24, 2017 Isca Silurum rated it liked it Nov 29, 2015 Avidreader rated it really liked it Sep 10, 2016 Elizabeth rated it really liked it Jun 28, 2017 Nicholas Kohler rated it really liked it Jan 12, 2016 Simone Martel rated it liked it Feb 26, 2016 Linda Semple rated it liked it Feb 11, 2017 Jasmine rated it it was amazing Apr 03, 2017 Linda Shoare rated it liked it Jan 08, 2016 previous 1 2 next new topicDiscuss This Book There are no discussion topics on this book yet Be the first to start one Recommend It Stats Recent Status Updates Readers Also Enjoyed.



Living on Paper Reviews

Living on Paper
Antonomasia

At last Ever since the Iris biopic was released, I ve wanted to read about Murdoch in her own words, and bemoaned the absence of a memoir so often that it was getting boring Letters will do very, very nicely instead.

Living on Paper
Stephen P

I m not finished but I am done I m de flittered I went into a room locked the door and covered the windows so I could illegally peek ahead More of her social and love life flitting from one to the other When in her letters she does mention what I was seeking, her brilliant mind battling with philosophic and academic issues When it occurred it was simply a brief reporting A huge disappointment Maybe I ll read the A.S Byatt Bio on her.

Living on Paper
Corey

I ve been reading Iris Murdoch s letters for 7 months, a few pages at a time There s a reason she is my favorite novelist and you can find hints at why in her correspondence, though she doesn t talk much about her own books Instead, her letters are full of love, requited and not, friendship, faith, politics, philosophy, intellect and passion I feel like I ve lived with her for most of this year and I m sorry now to leave her behind.

Living on Paper
Laura

From BBC Radio 4 Book of the Week Throughout her life, Iris Murdoch wrote thousands of letters Mostly to friends and lovers This episode focuses on her years as an Oxford undergraduate when she was full of hope and political idealism.2 5 In this episode, which embraces the years 1942 1944 when Murdoch was working at the Treasury, the letters to her Oxford friend, Frank Thompson, are particularly poignant.3 5 Iris Murdoch had not seen David Hicks since 1938 when they were both at Oxford, bu

Living on Paper
James Klagge

The fact that I finished a 600 page book in a few weeks indicates I found it interesting On the other hand I marked in pencil passages that I found, well, noteworthy, and there were only about 3 dozen, which is only about 1 every 17 pages Nevertheless, the letters were quite readable I would have edited it much severely, but I can imagine others found things interesting that I didn t Murdoch is interesting to me because she was both a philosopher and a novelist Her philosophical views

Living on Paper
James Murphy

I think Iris Murdoch one of the most interesting and learned writers of our time I ve read only a handful of the novels and some of the philosophy These letters inspire me to become involved with her novels which, we re told, are powered by her philosophic ideas.I didn t get a sense of her deep intellectual currents from the letters Almost all of them are personal rather than concerned with her writing or teaching Because she cared deeply for those she corresponded with, they re af

Living on Paper
Stephen Brody

Some subtlety can be so voluptuous I am so sorry I went to sleep How charming of you to attribute it to drink One should rest Potter around Admire one s Chinese plates Much love, Iris.I m not quite sure I approve of this habit of publishing the letters of people who have achieved fame from writing other things but are no longer here to defend themselves against misinterpretation or criticisms of their private lives from others whose own behaviour might not always bear too much simi

Living on Paper
Jonathan

The editors of this collection of Iris Murdoch s letters have done a good job in selecting ones which add to the biographical detail which is available in other books The connections she made to friends, lovers, and colleagues are given extra depth with her own words, along with the odd letter to politicians and The Times, showing how concerned she was with other matters outside her own sphere of teaching, writing and the life of an academic in general The overriding impression from them all i

Living on Paper
Eileen Hall

Although I was not really a fan of her work, this collection of letters show a different side to the person I imagined.They are informative and telling.She came over as funny, intelligent and loving.I was given a digital copy of this book by the publisher Princeton University Press via Netgalley in return for an honest unbiased review.

thumbnail Title: Living on Paper
Author:Iris Murdoch
ISBN :0701187050
ranting: 3.5
Reviewer: 513 Reviews
Description: Here, for the first time, is Iris Murdoch s life in her own words, from her schoolgirl days to her last years.The letters show a great mind at work we see the young Murdoch struggling with philosophic

6126 Users Online Now