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  • Title : The Sellout

  • Author:

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  • ISBN: 0374260508

  • Number of Pages: 289 pages


The Sellout Description

Paul Beatty s The Sellout showcases a comic genius at the top of his game A biting satire about a young man s isolated upbringing and the race trial that sends him to the Supreme Court, it challenges the sacred tenets of the United States Constitution, urban life, the civil rights movement, the father son relationship, and the holy grail of racial equality the black Chine Paul Beatty s The Sellout showcases a comic genius at the top of his game A biting satire about a young man s isolated upbringing and the race trial that sends him to the Supreme Court, it challenges the sacred tenets of the United States Constitution, urban life, the civil rights movement, the father son relationship, and the holy grail of racial equality the black Chinese restaurant.Born in the agrarian ghetto of Dickens on the southern outskirts of Los Angeles the narrator of The Sellout resigns himself to the fate of lower middle class Californians I d die in the same bedroom I d grown up in, looking up at the cracks in the stucco ceiling that ve been there since 68 quake Raised by a single father, a controversial sociologist, he spent his childhood as the subject in racially charged psychological studies He is led to believe that his father s pioneering work will result in a memoir that will solve his family s financial woes, but when his father is killed in a police shoot out, he realizes there never was a memoir All that s left is the bill for a drive thru funeral.Fueled by this deceit and the general disrepair of his hometown, the narrator sets out to right another wrong Dickens has literally been removed from the map to save California from further embarrassment Enlisting the help of the town s most famous resident the last surviving Little Rascal, Hominy Jenkins he initiates the most outrageous action conceivable reinstating slavery and segregating the local high school, which lands him in the Supreme Court Get A CopyKindle Store Online StoresAudibleBarnes NobleKoboApple iBooksGoogle PlayAbebooksBook DepositoryIndigoHalf.comAlibrisBetter World BooksIndieBoundLibraries Or buy for Hardcover, 289 pages Published 2015 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux More Details Original Title The Sellout ISBN 0374260508 ISBN13 9780374260507 Edition Language English Literary Awards Man Booker Prize 2016 , National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction 2015 , Hurston Wright Legacy Award Nominee for Fiction 2016 , The Rooster The Morning News Tournament of Books 2016 , International DUBLIN Literary Award Nominee 2017 Other Editions 29 All Editions Add a New Edition Combine Less Detail edit details Friend Reviews To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up Reader QA To ask other readers questions about The Sellout, please sign up Popular Answered Questions What is the meaning of Hominy Jenkins asking to become a slave Turn back in hisyory as the only way to save Dickens A statement about his already being enslaved by his past as a a black child actor I have the feeling I am missing something 9 likeslike one year ago See all 9 answers Kamran Rahman The novel is concerned with illustrating the perceived advantages of slavery for Hominy it gives him focus, value and status in a society where The novel is concerned with illustrating the perceived advantages of slavery for Hominy it gives him focus, value and status in a society where he otherwise has none The central question of the book appears to be How do we make progress on issues of race, given the current disadvantages suffered by black americans To explore this, two absurdist positions are set up Hominy wants to return to the certainty of the past Foy wants to re write history For Hominy there can be no progress in issues of social justice and that is why he wants to be a slave Hominy considers Foy s battle to be futile He has lived through extreme racism in the past, and he liked it less flag Im on page 80 and not enjoying the way this book is written, at all It seems to be a mission to get as much gibberish in one sentence, which sentence cannot be less than 300 hundred words Does it get better Should I keep going 1 likelike 6 months ago See all 4 answers David Edwards The narrator s flow can be a bit jarring at first, especially if you consider the number of references that you may not understand I found that if The narrator s flow can be a bit jarring at first, especially if you consider the number of references that you may not understand I found that if you don t dwell on these moments and keep the momentum you will be rewarded with some really clever observations less flag See all 9 questions about The Sellout Lists with This Book Goodreads Picks For Tournament of Books 2016 280 books 1,305 voters Man Booker 2016 Longlist 13 books 78 voters More lists with this book Community Reviews showing 1 30 filter sort default Rating Details 0 copy ratingGraph.clone j rating_details_tip_graph.remove copy.attr id , rating_details_tip_graph copy.find script.remove j rating_details_tip.prepend copy Nov 24, 2014 Jessica Woodbury rated it really liked it Shelves best 2015 arcs, authors of color If Kurt Vonnegut and Dave Chappelle had a baby and really messed with its head, it would write this novel I hope Paul Beatty takes that as a compliment because it s meant that way.This is some seriously biting satire You know it right away, since it begins with the main character, a black man, before the Supreme Court because he s charged with keeping a slave Most of the novel is a flashback, showing us how the protagonist not only kept a slave but attempted to re segregate his formerly all b If Kurt Vonnegut and Dave Chappelle had a baby and really messed with its head, it would write this novel I hope Paul Beatty takes that as a compliment because it s meant that way.This is some seriously biting satire You know it right away, since it begins with the main character, a black man, before the Supreme Court because he s charged with keeping a slave Most of the novel is a flashback, showing us how the protagonist not only kept a slave but attempted to re segregate his formerly all black now mostly hispanic city Yes, it sounds crazy It sounds even crazier because the narrator isn t a racist crazy person, but a relatively enlightened guy who s decided this is how he gets his city back on the map It s a zany book, a constant study of and commentary on race It s often hilarious and not for the faint of heart or tired of mind I had a great time reading it, but I admit now I m hesitant to know how to talk about it So much in this book is untouchable and off limits and taboo It s also brilliant and constantly unexpected flag 361 likesLike see review View all 15 comments Jan 28, 2016 Glenn Sumi rated it liked it Shelves booker winners Paul Beatty s novel is a savage satire about a post racial America, and it points out how absurd that notion really is.The black narrator, Bonbon, grew up in a disappeared L.A suburb once an agrarian ghetto, called Dickens where he was subjected to his father s sociological experiments about race.After his father is accidentally killed by the LAPD see This is some serious shit , he wants to reintroduce slavery and, gradually, segregation, first in buses and then in a school ditto Paul Beatty s novel is a savage satire about a post racial America, and it points out how absurd that notion really is.The black narrator, Bonbon, grew up in a disappeared L.A suburb once an agrarian ghetto, called Dickens where he was subjected to his father s sociological experiments about race.After his father is accidentally killed by the LAPD see This is some serious shit , he wants to reintroduce slavery and, gradually, segregation, first in buses and then in a school ditto.He elicits help from his friend, Hominy, the last surviving member of TV s Little Rascals he was Buckwheat s understudy All his efforts eventually land him in jail, where his case goes to the Supreme Court I read this book months ago, but didn t review it then I m not sure why I didn t get all the references, and while I found Beatty s prose and ideas sharp, lively and Omigod did he just write that funny, I also found the experience exhausting.Humour and this book is hilarious at times is a brilliant way of dealing with serious subjects But you ve got to mix up your act I guess I wanted the book to be grounded, so the angry humour could stand out in relief There s the opportunity to do that in the possible romantic relationship between the narrator and a bus driver, but Beatty doesn t do much with this.Still, Beatty takes on every African American stereotype and politically correct notion and successfully skewers it Goodreaders especially will appreciate his extended riff on the liberal white washing of literature.Thus, Mark Twain s classic gets renamed The Pejorative Free Adventures and Intellectual and Spiritual Journeys of African American Jim and His Young Prot g , White Brother Huckleberry Finn, as They Go in Search of the Lost Black Family Unit.Some stand alone sections are brilliant, savage little poetic salvos whose targets are worthy of sending up Beatty started out as a poet But as much as I enjoyed the book, and appreciated the ideas Beatty raised, I think I like my anger and injustice served up a bit directly flag 187 likesLike see review View all 36 comments Dec 12, 2016 Steve rated it really liked it As an urban commuter I felt that pulling a book out with lawn jockeys on the cover should come with a disclaimer Hey everybody, it s meant to be you know ironic It s written by a black guy it s satire And just so you know, my iPhone doesn t have one word of Breitbart News on it.Satires, to me, are like hoppy craft beers The natural skew to the bitter side should be balanced out for optimal flavor Paul Beatty s deft touch with a joke made the astringency you d expect from charges of rac As an urban commuter I felt that pulling a book out with lawn jockeys on the cover should come with a disclaimer Hey everybody, it s meant to be you know ironic It s written by a black guy it s satire And just so you know, my iPhone doesn t have one word of Breitbart News on it.Satires, to me, are like hoppy craft beers The natural skew to the bitter side should be balanced out for optimal flavor Paul Beatty s deft touch with a joke made the astringency you d expect from charges of racism something other than a straight diatribe Smiles open minds than they close.The premise of the book is actually sort of absurd Bonbon, the narrator, farms the land in the agrarian ghetto neighborhood of LA called Dickens His father was a sociologist who performed half crazy, race centric experiments on him when he was young that never amounted to meaningful research, but did mess with his mind a bit When his father died shot in a police snafu , the son inherited the farm, a funeral bill, and a legacy of racial awareness Then, since it was an embarrassment to the city of LA, Dickens just disappeared from the map At that point our narrator mounts an informal campaign to bring Dickens back He makes signs announcing that a driver is entering, draws lines surrounding the area, then hits on the idea of segregating it to really stand out He had an accomplice named Hominy Jenkins, a celebrity of sorts, known for being the last surviving cast member from The Little Rascals Hominy, like the famous Buckwheat, was a pickaninny who could black it up with bug eyes and electrified hair on cue Somehow Hominy had it in his increasingly senile head that race had meaning to him then and that a way to recapture this feeling was to offer himself up as a slave doing light labor he was old on the farm The book opens out of order, with this voluntary slavery case being heard by the Supreme Court Like I said, it s kind of ridiculous, but it does allow a very full discussion of race the stereotypes, the archetypes, and a panoply of attitudes from subtle to extreme.What the book lacked in plausibility it made up for in presentation It s like a serious essay on black consciousness as presented by Dave Chappelle at his edgy, observational best Let my try to convince you by way of example As Bonbon s court case was making its way up the judicial ladder, he said In neighborhoods like the one I grew up in, places that are poor in praxis but rich in rhetoric, the homies have a saying I d rather be judged by twelve than carried by six I m not all that streetwise, but to my knowledge there s no appellate court corollary I ve never heard a corner store roughneck take a sip of malt liquor and say, I d rather be reviewed by nine than arbitrated by one He wondered why a certain successful type would mostly talk black, dropping g s in their gerunds, but when it came to their public television appearances, they d sound like Kelsey Grammer with a stick up his ass Opining about another black intellectual Come on, he cares about black people like a seven footer cares about basketball He has to care because what else would he be good at Foy Cheshire was a prominent archetype who hosted a dying cable show focusing on black issues, had become successful stealing ideas from the narrator s father, and had no original thoughts of his own Foy was the one who had dubbed Bonbon the sellout for not buying into a very particular brand of racial animosity Someone speculated that If he Foy was indeed an autodidact, there s no doubt he had the world s shittiest teacher In one of the few non race related comments, Bonbon said I ve always liked rote The formulaic repetitiveness of filing and stuffing envelopes appeals to me in some fundamental life affirming way I would ve made a good factory worker, supply room clerk, or Hollywood scriptwriter Hominy was actually pretty lucid for someone who sought beatings and servitude One example You know, massa, Bugs Bunny wasn t nothing but Br er Rabbit with a better agent Here s a great rejoinder to all who suggest, You d rather be here than in Africa The trump card all narrow minded nativists play I seriously doubt that some slave ship ancestor, in those idle moments between being raped and beaten, was standing knee deep in their own feces rationalizing that, in the end, the generations of murder, unbearable pain and suffering, mental anguish, and rampant disease will all be worth it because someday my great great great great grandson will have Wi Fi I also liked the name that Bonbon imagined for the white only school in his planned segregation Wheaton Academy In contrast, nonwhites had Chaff Middle School The Wheaton Chaff distinction was a big one.I laughed every time I picked this book up And I m certainly sympathetic to the essential plight, despite the anaesthetizing humor In addition, though I didn t catch every reference, my street smart IQ is now at least a little closer to triple digits Plus, its recognition in winning the National Book Critics Circle award for fiction as well as the Booker Prize speaks to the quality of the writing Beatty s background in poetry comes through with great word choices and cadences Even so, I had to dock one star While it s easy enough to see the satirical poke at wrong headedness, it was harder to figure the purpose of Bonbon s ironic prescription I wouldn t presume that the segregation was meant to provide motivation for Blacks and Latinos, though the Chaff School s rising performance numbers were cited as though they were a consequence of having been separated The fact is, though, there weren t any white kids there to begin with Was it like the arguments you sometimes hear about the advantages of an education at a traditionally black university I couldn t say Nor do I think the counterintuitive premise was meant just for a laugh My best guess is that the extreme actions slavery and segregation orchestrated by a black man were meant to draw attention to the still existing, subtle forms of racism There was a line in the book about how it s illegal to shout fire in a crowded theater Bonbon went on to say that he whispered Racism in a post racial world Beatty himself, in interviews, is tight lipped when asked what he thinks it all means Maybe the discussions the book inspires are what matter most flag 151 likesLike see review View all 39 comments Aug 23, 2016 Hugh rated it liked it review of another edition Shelves modern lit, booker winners, read 2016 Satire is a difficult genre to assess and review, particularly when it is so tightly bound to a culture one does not share On the positive side, this book is often very funny, and is full of ideas and snipes at deserving targets Over the length of a novel, though, the tone is somewhat relentless, and the story does not seem to have enough weight to sustain the interest it seems like a series of set pieces Not a book to read if you are easily offended either, but the issues Beatty addre Satire is a difficult genre to assess and review, particularly when it is so tightly bound to a culture one does not share On the positive side, this book is often very funny, and is full of ideas and snipes at deserving targets Over the length of a novel, though, the tone is somewhat relentless, and the story does not seem to have enough weight to sustain the interest it seems like a series of set pieces Not a book to read if you are easily offended either, but the issues Beatty addresses about the state of race relations in America 50 years after Martin Luther King cannot be faced without such boldness So an interesting book to have read, but maybe not quite the stuff of Booker winners, and I hope there are better ones on the longlist flag 82 likesLike see review View all 13 comments Dec 08, 2015 Trish rated it really liked it Shelves fiction, literature, social science, funny, quirky, race, parody when I did what I did, I wasn t thinking about inalienable rights, the proud history of our people I did what worked, and since when did a little slavery and segregation ever hurt anybody, and if so, so fucking be it My copy of this novel is spiked with tabs marking something deeply insightful, stabbingly funny, or needing revisiting There is simply too much to point to Beatty must have been saving up observations about race relations in America to get so much into this relatively short no when I did what I did, I wasn t thinking about inalienable rights, the proud history of our people I did what worked, and since when did a little slavery and segregation ever hurt anybody, and if so, so fucking be it My copy of this novel is spiked with tabs marking something deeply insightful, stabbingly funny, or needing revisiting There is simply too much to point to Beatty must have been saving up observations about race relations in America to get so much into this relatively short novel He never tells us why his fictional California town is named Dickens it can t be about the author but I think it has to do with a classic American imprecation Go to the Dickens though I am certainly willing to be challenged on this supposition Dickens is also used as an exclamatory What the dickens standing in for What the F k in marginally polite white dialogue, and perhaps even in the L il Rascals film archives, though I am going to have to check on that They won t admit it, but every black person thinks they re better than every other black person Beatty s narrator, Bonbon Me, is the sellout He just doesn t seem to get the black thing He identifies as human first, black second Beatty doesn t target black folk alone Everyone is skewered in this wild ride through a Los Angeles southwest suburb that still has farm zoning, allowing families to live among livestock, chickens, cotton, watermelon, and weed A proud descendant of the Kentucky family called Mee and one whose forefather subsequently dropped the extraneous e, our narrator Bonbon Me has a case before the Supreme Court, a screw faced black Justice, about his ownership of a slave in the present day That alleged slave, Hominy Jenkins, literally declaimed his status one day to our narrator as a result of Me still having agricultural interests and therefore probably needing a slave Hominy moved in What could Me do Well, shortly after rapacious real estate developers convinced officials to remove signs demarking the township of Dickens, Me made and put up new signs and drew a white line around the streets and houses comprising Dickens and re segregated No Whites Allowed One may be curious why he would do this, since the town was already black, but he felt he was saving something, making a point They can t just muscle in and erase a town a culture a people That s not fairness People actually do care if you are white, brown, black or yellow Sellout Bonbon had mused for some that if the black community in Dickens just took their racial blinders off for one second, they d realize Dickens was no longer black but predominantly Latino So he was just making Dickens equal by excluding whites It s not discrimination exactly It s equality The Supreme Court is where the country takes out its dick and tits and decides who s going to get fucked and who s getting a taste of mother s milk It s constitutional pornography in there and what about obscenity I know it when I see it Me vs the United States of America demands a fundamental examination of what we mean by separate, by equal, by black Beatty demurs when critics point out his work as a satire It isn t, he says It s reportage The material in this book is, in fact, observable in everyday America Black people don t even talk about race Nothing s attributable to color any It s all mitigating circumstances The only people discussing race with any insight and courage are loud middle aged white men well read open minded white kids a few freelance journalists in Detroit Author interviews with Beatty are some of the most uncomfortable I have ever heard or read Beatty stutters and avoids, sometimes flat out refuses to entertain a question Examples Boston NPR Onpoint, and Ebony He clearly doesn t like talking about what his book means He wants his book to start the conversation We re supposed to be telling him what it means to us as individuals rather than as a class He says often in interviews, I am uncomfortable talking about this He does not appear to be uncomfortable writing about what he sees and what he thinks about what he sees, so folks interested in making him a spokesperson for black people will have to turn to his writing But there aren t answers there, either, really It is just raw material for the discussion we are all meant to have In a reading Beatty gave at Politics Prose, the Washington, D.C bookstore, Beatty told the audience that he teaches a writing course at Columbia University and one of his students said to him, I feel sorry for you guys as though the race issue were finished, and is nothing now compared with yesterday Beatty was shocked It reminded me of young, upwardly mobile women saying they don t experience sexism today Me, I incline towards Ta Nehisi Coates June 2014 Atlantic article, The Case for Reparations Not that money will fix anything It is the discussion about reparations that might fix something Nigerian novelist Chris Abani, in a riveting conversation with American novelist Walter Mosley, says America has had a unique relationship with blackness that, say, Europe really hasn t had As much as people like to pretend, slavery isn t really over flag 80 likesLike see review View all 21 comments Aug 29, 2016 Jibran added it review of another edition Recommended to Jibran by Booker longlist 16 Shelves fiction, american Subtitle A mini dictionary of the oddities and eccentricities of Black America mixed in with a bevy of pop culture obscurities interspersed with some brilliant flashes of satire by Paul Beatty.For the sake modesty, let me say that I m in two minds whether the special outweighs the ordinary and vice versa But there s no doubt that the book is designed as a commercial product for timely consumption given the rise in racial tensions in the US in the last few years But this alone has never been a Subtitle A mini dictionary of the oddities and eccentricities of Black America mixed in with a bevy of pop culture obscurities interspersed with some brilliant flashes of satire by Paul Beatty.For the sake modesty, let me say that I m in two minds whether the special outweighs the ordinary and vice versa But there s no doubt that the book is designed as a commercial product for timely consumption given the rise in racial tensions in the US in the last few years But this alone has never been a good reason for me to give passing marks to a book, because fictionalisation of contemporary events, dramatisation of social political issues and suchlike require something than what is apparent on the surface.Like others, I love the idea of employing humour to deal with serious subjects Recently I read Tram 83, a breath of fresh air which uses satire to produce a stable and effective metaphor of the struggles of the post colonial Africa, without weighing us down with the uselessness of recording real historical political events to make it credible The contrast with The Sellout couldn t be obvious.It is not essential that an event be sketched out in exact detail for literature to be believable Sometimes the exact sketch of reality is not as powerful as one portrayed with the help of imagination Real facts and references help up to a point, but beyond that they become obstacles to the evolution of a work The Sellout, gets mired in its own mass when it offers unfettered social commentary about everything that concerns Black America, Imperial America, Provincial America.I am about halfway through and pausing it for the time being.August 16 flag 74 likesLike see review View all 14 comments Feb 25, 2015 John Pappas rated it it was amazing Imagine Nina Simone singing Mississippi Goddam reincarnated as an atomic bomb thatexplodes high enough for all of America to see, while Mark Twain chuckles and says I told ya so, from the relative safety of a bunker deep in the canon of American literature That s nowhere near how incendiary, biting, acerbic, witty, smart, funny, explosive, hard hitting and revelatory Beatty s satire is The first 50 pages had me wondering if he could sustain this voice, this force for another pagethe nex Imagine Nina Simone singing Mississippi Goddam reincarnated as an atomic bomb thatexplodes high enough for all of America to see, while Mark Twain chuckles and says I told ya so, from the relative safety of a bunker deep in the canon of American literature That s nowhere near how incendiary, biting, acerbic, witty, smart, funny, explosive, hard hitting and revelatory Beatty s satire is The first 50 pages had me wondering if he could sustain this voice, this force for another pagethe next 250 pages had me wondering how he succeeded and kept succeeding Make no mistake, reading this book is like getting into the ring with the son of Richard Pryor and Dave Chappelle if that son was given at birth to Muhammed Ali to raise This book s language burns bright and showed up to fight hard This is a book made for our times, one that is willing to ask difficult questions about 21st century identity, place and politics, and one that is not for the faint of heart flag 70 likesLike see review View all 3 comments Dec 01, 2015 Joachim Stoop rated it liked it I don t recall reading a book which I loved so much in the beginning and was soooo fed up with in the end It s too much of too much There are about zero normal sentences and that was very tiring It reminded me of Steve Toltz Quicksand I couldn t keep up with avalanches and avalanches of wit satire It s a damn shame, cuz I laughed out loud the first chapters.I also think the book is better for native speakers lots of linguistic humor and if you live in the States lots of inside jo I don t recall reading a book which I loved so much in the beginning and was soooo fed up with in the end It s too much of too much There are about zero normal sentences and that was very tiring It reminded me of Steve Toltz Quicksand I couldn t keep up with avalanches and avalanches of wit satire It s a damn shame, cuz I laughed out loud the first chapters.I also think the book is better for native speakers lots of linguistic humor and if you live in the States lots of inside jokes, historical commercial pop cultural references I would give it a try and maybe read it slow and in several sittings flag 70 likesLike see review View all 7 comments Sep 14, 2015 Claire Wolff rated it it was ok One star for creativity, another for brilliant, innovative, hysterical prose, and a third for waking America up with a slap upside our post racial national head Every sentence in this novel is a combination of Um, YES, that is so true and I can t believe I ve never thought of it that way before Minus a star for lack of compelling plot Beatty gets so lost in his ridiculous subplots that I stopped caring what happened next Will Dickens be saved from obsolescence Will the Dum Dum Intell One star for creativity, another for brilliant, innovative, hysterical prose, and a third for waking America up with a slap upside our post racial national head Every sentence in this novel is a combination of Um, YES, that is so true and I can t believe I ve never thought of it that way before Minus a star for lack of compelling plot Beatty gets so lost in his ridiculous subplots that I stopped caring what happened next Will Dickens be saved from obsolescence Will the Dum Dum Intellectuals be vindicated Will Marpessa love our narrator again What will Justice Thomas decide These threads are lost in hilarious philosophizing about the racial implications of psychology 1950s television marijuana surfing This is definitely an unprecedented, one of a kind novel, but with underdeveloped characters and a nonlinear narration, at times humor is the only thing keeping it afloat flag 57 likesLike see review View all 5 comments Aug 02, 2016 Peter Boyle rated it liked it Shelves booker winners, booker nominee This may be hard to believe, coming from a black man, but I ve never stolen anything So begins the first page in this scathing satire of race in America Our narrator is up before the Supreme Court, charged with attempting to reinstate slavery and segregation in his hometown of Dickens, a rundown neighborhood of Los Angeles His accomplices are Hominy Jenkins, a former child star of the Little Rascals, and Marpessa Dawson, a foul mouthed bus driver and the object of our hero s affections But This may be hard to believe, coming from a black man, but I ve never stolen anything So begins the first page in this scathing satire of race in America Our narrator is up before the Supreme Court, charged with attempting to reinstate slavery and segregation in his hometown of Dickens, a rundown neighborhood of Los Angeles His accomplices are Hominy Jenkins, a former child star of the Little Rascals, and Marpessa Dawson, a foul mouthed bus driver and the object of our hero s affections But what really drives this thoughtful, intelligent character is his relationship with his dead father a tough and imposing psychologist who performed all manner of social experiments on his son His authoritative presence in the black community looms over the narrator s life But it also drives him to shake up his crumbling hometown by outrageous and controversial means.I can certainly see why this novel has been showered with praise it is a timely and fearless examination of race relations in present day America In fact it may cut a little too close to the bone for some there were several times when I thought to myself Woah, did he actually just say that Politics, pop culture, the media s portrayal of African Americans so many aspects of US life are targeted and turned upside down by Beatty s razor sharp musings I ll admit that several references went over my head but that s the beauty of this book it s so bursting with ideas that you really feel like you ve learned something by the time you reach the end As a story, I don t think it works so well the pace is uneven and Beatty too often meanders with monologues to show off his admittedly large brain But as a demented and daring satire, it deserves every accolade An enlightening and thought provoking read flag 52 likesLike see review View all 8 comments Oct 28, 2014 Rebecca Foster rated it really liked it review of another edition Shelves laugh out loud, booker winners, reviewed shiny new books 3.5 This is such an outrageous racial satire that I kept asking myself how Beatty got away with it Not only did he get away with it, he won a National Book Critics Circle Award, and now the Booker Prize The novel opens at the U.S Supreme Court, where the narrator has been summoned to defend himself against a grievous but entirely true accusation he has reinstituted slavery and segregation in his hometown of Dickens, California All the old stereotypes of African Americans are here, many of 3.5 This is such an outrageous racial satire that I kept asking myself how Beatty got away with it Not only did he get away with it, he won a National Book Critics Circle Award, and now the Booker Prize The novel opens at the U.S Supreme Court, where the narrator has been summoned to defend himself against a grievous but entirely true accusation he has reinstituted slavery and segregation in his hometown of Dickens, California All the old stereotypes of African Americans are here, many of them represented by Hominy Jenkins This reminded me most of Ishmael Reed s satires and, oddly enough, Julian Barnes s England, England, which similarly attempts to distill an entire culture and history into a limited space and time The plot is downright silly in places, but the shock value keeps you reading Even so, after the incendiary humor of the first third, the satire wears a bit thin I yearned for of an introspective Bildungsroman, which there are indeed hints of See my full review at Shiny New Books flag 54 likesLike see review View all 7 comments Mar 02, 2017 Antonomasia rated it it was amazing review of another edition Shelves booker, humour, modern american fiction, decade 2010s, 2017, el This isn t literary fiction so much as extended stand up comedy The sort that happens when Stewart Lee spins one of his crazed, spiralling stories that lasts half the set yes it s political, but also surreal and vicious and somehow sympathetic, and just too fucking funny to dismiss as worthy or heavy handed The Sellout is not your negative stereotype dreary litfic Booker winner Those people who normally see a Winner of the Man Booker Prize sticker as a radioactivity hazard label Plenty of This isn t literary fiction so much as extended stand up comedy The sort that happens when Stewart Lee spins one of his crazed, spiralling stories that lasts half the set yes it s political, but also surreal and vicious and somehow sympathetic, and just too fucking funny to dismiss as worthy or heavy handed The Sellout is not your negative stereotype dreary litfic Booker winner Those people who normally see a Winner of the Man Booker Prize sticker as a radioactivity hazard label Plenty of them would love this novel.Shame on me that whilst I was vaguely interested in The Sellout after seeing a review describing it as Pynchon lite because sometimes you want all the fun without all the looking stuff up before the 2016 longlist announcement, I m not sure I d have necessarily got round to reading it otherwise the cover doesn t look a quarter as much fun as what s inside and the blurb is waaaaay too serious I read the beginnings of all the longlisted books around the end of July and from this one got that same buzz, wow wow.wow that I swear hadn t felt since I read the start of The Luminaries three years earlier felt instinctively that this should could be the winner Then not long afters got one of my occasional weird OCD block things that happens with a few books, and couldn t read it I was kind of frustrated I hadn t put money on it to win, but Monday gone, I kind of forgot about that when Casey Affleck s Oscar made up for it Some people had said The Sellout wasn t as good in the second half, but for me pretty much all of it lived up to the promise of those early pages.Politics on both sides of the Atlantic has moved at lightning speed in the two years coincidentally to the day since The Sellout was published One of the top GR reviews of the novel introduces it as a satire about the fallacy of a post racial America No one needs that idea pointed out in Trump s banana republic But thankfully, this is an overly simplistic characterisation of the book, which is in any case still too line by line funny to be a mere mayfly I don t get why some people don t like that much humour in a novel, but they don t After reading some comments during Booker season, I had been expecting the book to start feeling like an exhausting 300 page onslaught of one liners it never did though, it s just the right amount Prety thick and fast in the early pages, then maybe slightly further between, with story in place, but Beatty never runs out of comedy, and it s never too much Dude knows what he s doing And he did used to to standup and slam poetry.Someone keeps saying how funny a book is, they should provide quotes, right With this one, where to start Can I be lazy and link the GR quotes page for the book Even if a lot of the top ones are all the near cheesily serious lines, a bit further down there is ample evidence of witOther thing I don t get I am really not a Yankophile I ve even gone out of my way to avoid American lit some years, and all yr fave box sets of the decade, The Wire, Mad Men, that one with the drug lab and the sequel with the lawyer quite seriously couldn t recall the titles at first there , Orange Is the New Black, never seen em, or not than a couple of episodes Okay, I read a few anti racism critical race theory blogs a few years ago, cos I wanted to understand the premise behind SJW culture, but those don t give you pop culture that s a decade or two or three old And I didn t know about lawn jockeys the garden ornaments on the cover before When I saw some reviews from fellow Brits saying they didn t get lots of the references in The Sellout, I was like, but this is common general knowledge and has been for ages huh Felt the same through the book And most of the locally specific is phrased in such a way that it s obviously a characterisation of how things are in a certain place, put in such a way that it s still recognisably very funny as well as telling you something kind of new I think the UK has had than enough US culture imports for the book to be gettable for people here however, it makes sense that it may be impenetrable for those in non Anglosphere countries who don t take an especial interest in America But yeah, people who know their US pop culture, and or who ve spent a fair bit of time reading pre Trump online American opinion articles about race, may be most at ease with this book.I don t think this is a book with a single clearcut message it s of an it s not like that i.e not a post racial idyll , it s hella complicated I always felt that The Sellout was having as much of a dig at the new wave of separatism fuelled by radicals alongside awareness of its advantages and disadvantages as at those who naively thought it was all fine once Obama was elected, at old timey overt racism, at hipsters, at black conservatives and academics, at everybody, really Lately I ve been hearing of friends of friends of friends, people I used to know and the like, who ve been falling into partly rightward leaning politics and conspiracy theories, which some of them apparently started on because they, like me, had issues with the extremes of the SJW tendency, no platforming etc But unlike me, they seem not to have been lucky enough to spend time with, and be guided in their perspective by, friends who think these things are a bit much, but who are also essentially kind and decent and have empathy for the underlying problems behind these humourless, censorious agendas Reading The Sellout, I started wishing some of these individuals who ve veered partially rightwing had been recommended this book a year or two ago, so they might have understood that humour can have a place in race politics too, and got some idea of why Black Lives Matter is valid, told in a way that they d be on board with The narrator s upbringing may be an allegory of how racism affects the psyche of minorities, or is it also saying that some people overemphasise the negatives or both, the latter being something that would occur for complex and individually variable reasons anyway Plenty of other features are similarly prismatic, like Marpessa s fondness for a selection of highbrow and classic literature and films by white men, which could be a way of playing up the character as a fictional post racial male fantasy, not a real working class black woman but among them are works that Zadie Smith likes As I ve always felt that contemporary feminism blows certain problems out of proportion, I found aspects of the narrator s view of race politics, and his sometimes contradictory, experience fuelled perspective, understandable and I think it s all presented in such a way that the book could speak to those who felt things weren t that bad and tell them hang on a minute as well as to those who ll see him as a straight up satire with opinions quite unlike any they would entertain The lack of definite conclusion is arguably a copout in pure storytelling terms, but it s essential in preserving the complexity of the book as political commentary, and to retaining its status as humour and entertainment, not preaching As with much political comedy, if one boiled certain storylines or paragraphs down to their underlying meaning, it could sound didactic but the skill is in the presentation, where it very rarely does.I think this is a fantastic book with an ideal blend of maximum on the ground relevance and maximum humour, and I want to recommend it to loads of people However, the GR ratings, including a few from people I know who liked it but not quite as much as I did suggest a tad caution But if you like savagely topical comedy and have some knowledge of American African American pop culture and maybe an academic background with psychology helps a little bit too then it may be a whole lot fun than you d think from the jacket This extract of Beatty s first novel in Granta with an unwittingly prescient first line shows that his style has been sharp for a long time, the sort that can really interest me, for one, in an unfamiliar milieu, and I hope to be able to read of his work It s what awards should do, turn people on to great authors they hadn t otherwise read And in this particular case, break their own mould from time to time flag 44 likesLike see review View all 6 comments Mar 23, 2015 Matthew rated it really liked it As I finish this book, I sit in an airport, with CNN muted on the television above me Balti Riots Race It somehow seems like a fitting pair It is worth noting, the Balti riots are substantially less humorous than Beatty s book In a time where race in America is at an absolute boiling point, Paul Beatty comes along with a book so bold and brave, people will see it as either absolutely repugnant, or undeniably brilliant I m in the latter group.First thing first This book is hilario As I finish this book, I sit in an airport, with CNN muted on the television above me Balti Riots Race It somehow seems like a fitting pair It is worth noting, the Balti riots are substantially less humorous than Beatty s book In a time where race in America is at an absolute boiling point, Paul Beatty comes along with a book so bold and brave, people will see it as either absolutely repugnant, or undeniably brilliant I m in the latter group.First thing first This book is hilarious Outrageously so Where you ll find yourself bursting out with laughter in public spaces, only to attract the stares of strangers I haven t laughed this hard reading a book in a long, long time Secondly, Beatty s like a coked up 24 hour news cycle, recalling decades of stereotypes with rapid fire delivery There s no filter, and no time to pause From page one, he fires off on everything from slavery to police brutality and everything in between It feels like a deep exhale that Beatty s been holding in for years And all of this would be so deeply depressing if it weren t so absurdly hilarious I loved this book It speaks to so many taboo issues in our world today, and Beatty takes them on head on With no apologies Funny, raw, irreverent and unbelievably timely, I highly recommend this book Four and a half stars flag 44 likesLike see review View all 4 comments Apr 09, 2016 Perry rated it liked it Rhapsodical Reflections and Uproarious Ramblings on Racism in Post Racial America3.4 5 Re Man Booker Prize, 2016Consuetus Lector Blimey In a manner of speaking, unbloodybelievable This busts belief s bollocks, lampoons logic, cold cocks common sense Need I go on This novel mostly reads like the rhapsodical ramblings and reflections of a racially righteous rebel challenging the status quo With mordant wit, incisive satirical spins and terrific comic timing, Paul Beatty ingeniously unmask Rhapsodical Reflections and Uproarious Ramblings on Racism in Post Racial America3.4 5 Re Man Booker Prize, 2016Consuetus Lector Blimey In a manner of speaking, unbloodybelievable This busts belief s bollocks, lampoons logic, cold cocks common sense Need I go on This novel mostly reads like the rhapsodical ramblings and reflections of a racially righteous rebel challenging the status quo With mordant wit, incisive satirical spins and terrific comic timing, Paul Beatty ingeniously unmasks racism, both the blatant kind disguised and the kind idling in unheeded places, camouflaged by rules and regulations or concealed in societal customs The book was a real eye opener in several ways.For much of it, the novel is laugh out loud funny, but the story staggered home from around page 200 of a 300 page book flag 43 likesLike see review View all 5 comments Oct 29, 2016 Maxwell marked it as dnf review of another edition Shelves kindle, man booker, 2016 Not in the mood for this right now Will hopefully return to it in the future flag 42 likesLike see review View all 6 comments Mar 15, 2017 4triplezed rated it it was amazing review of another edition Shelves my fiction, the classics or deserve to be, man booker How does a white, late 50 s, Australian come to read a satire on race relations in the USA, an area he has little knowledge about in said subject I had recently read the brilliant A Brief History of Seven Killings by Marlon James and was telling all and sundry what a superb read it was I could recall a fair bit of the heady days of Marley and the powerful political fallout in Jamaica back in the late 70 s I had got Exodus on release so was not in new territory subject wise The writing and How does a white, late 50 s, Australian come to read a satire on race relations in the USA, an area he has little knowledge about in said subject I had recently read the brilliant A Brief History of Seven Killings by Marlon James and was telling all and sundry what a superb read it was I could recall a fair bit of the heady days of Marley and the powerful political fallout in Jamaica back in the late 70 s I had got Exodus on release so was not in new territory subject wise The writing and presentation was so powerful as to be mesmerising and I was hooked But in conversation all and sundry began to tell me about this book by Paul Beatty called The Sellout All and sundry finally became the final push to read The Sellout in the shape of a new dad at a suburban one year old s birthday party, you know the type of event, the mums all go gah gah at the kids and the dads talk about other things while their kids gorge themselves on cake The all and sundry new dad, I am not a new dad by the way, just kept shaking his head about this book The Sellout He had various ways of saying read it you have to read it by the sound of it if you liked that Marley book you have to read this if you like satire you have to read this sounds like a little bit of humour in that Marley book but this is entirely satirical humour so you have to read it I did not understand a lot of the references but I got the gist to the point that you have to read it and so on and so forth And so I did About 70 pages in, I discovered a few things As mentioned above I knew little of US race relations and a fair few of the references towards that thorny subject were beyond me So with that I started afresh and while reading marked each not or little understood reference and referred back to them with an internet search after each chapter With that all I can say is what a journey The journey has been a slow read as the enormity of my lack of knowledge loomed large I read each wiki or other link as I went on a weird and wonderful journey into both a political, cultural, and most of all, satirical look at the subject at hand My copy says that one review said the longer I stared at the pages the smarter I would get Nice And with that new intelligence all I can say is what a book, what a hilarious learning curve it all was for this little white boy What can I add I mean there are meaningful dissertations on The Sellout than the drivel I am writing but just maybe anyone from a non US background, who is white and sheltered from US race issues can use the links I used to assist them along in this riveting read And my apologies for missing any I put in what I did not know, know little about or just did not recall Enjoy Prologue court Courtroom friezes The South Wall Frieze includes figures of lawgivers from the ancient world and includes Menes, Hammurabi, Moses, Solomon, Lycurgus, Solon, Draco, Confucius, and Augustus Shit You Shovel 66 My best effort at translation of the following yo soy el gran pinche mayate julio cesar chavez es un putoI think it means I am the great dung beetle servant Julio Cesar Chavez is a fucker See comment 20 below Remus ihttp www.imdb.com character ch0032774 dyslexia Dum Dum Donut Intellectuals https en.wikipedia.org wiki Dave_EgExact Change, or Zen and the Art of Bus Riding and Relationship Repair.https en.m.wikipedia.org wiki Guy_Lhttps en.wikipedia.org wiki Drakkar Threes Marleys back up singers never knew Prince was called His Royal Badness before need to read Kafka as I never have how to pronounce Tchotchkehttps www.youtube.com watch v xd5ijhttps en.wikipedia.org wiki Rodney_https en.wikipedia.org wiki Attack_I admit to never having heard of this book Wallace was a sanga short of a picnic 1981, horse meat labelled as beef was discovered at a Foodmaker plant that supplied hamburger and taco meat to Jack in the Box The meat was originally from Profreeze of Australia, and during their checks on location, the food inspectors discovered other shipments destined for the United States which included kangaroo meat 23 24 Color Of Burnt Toast page 142 Many Mexicans muertes del jaripeo The 101 deaths of jaripeo 1,000 litros de sangre a thousand litres of blood si chingas el toro, te llevas los cuernos If you fuck the bull, you get the horns complexion 165 Spanish translates to Every day of my professional career I think the same thing Of these two hundred and fifty children, how many will finish high school Forty percent Orale, and of that lucky hundred, how many will go to college Online, junior, clown college, or whatever About five, or less And how many will graduate Two, maybe What a pity We re nuts thanks to Antonomasia from for that translation I see Paris I see France cahttps en.wikipedia.org wiki ChitlinApples and Oranges bevhttp www.lowrider.com Translates as My panties are wet millar de muchachos mexicanos translates as a 1000 mexican boys gardens iota gamma and bones mhttps en.wikipedia.org wiki Civil_R covers the lot Unmitigated Blackness the overacting of Cruise made this a difficult watchhttps www.google.com.au q co%C3%B1 chupa mi verga, carbon suck my dick Skreeches It s the Turtles, the Skreetches, the David Schwimmers and the George Costanzas of the Group refers to the meek lovable losers good guy characters from the following TV shows 1 Entourage , in the case of Turtle 2 Saved by the Bell , in the case of Screech 3 Friends , in the case of Ross David Schwimmer and4 Seinfeld , in the case of George Costanza as per comment posted Chivdog 20 6 17https en.wikipedia.org wiki David_Shttps en.wikipedia.org wiki Mark_Lahttps en.wikipedia.org wiki Sojournhttps en.wikipedia.org wiki Moms_Mahttps en.wikipedia.org wiki Donald_https en.wikipedia.org wiki Chesterhttps en.wikipedia.org wiki Abbey_Lhttps en.wikipedia.org wiki Marcus_ the judge or the author Hop Cop Modig Be Brave in Swedish When I translate this later and reread the context it adds to my consideration that this is one very witty book The negro to black conversion experience flag 39 likesLike see review View all 21 comments Mar 03, 2017 Lee rated it it was amazing review of another edition Shelves favorites Audacity, execution, authority, oomph, heft, humor the most enjoyable, truly enlightened, contemporary novel originally written in the English language I ve read in a long, long time I read some of the author s first novel after it came out back when I lived in Brooklyn and a friend recommended it but I didn t make my way too far through it, thinking it too derivative of Ishmael Reed, whose Flight to Canada and Mumbo Jumbo I read in college and loved Now, the influence still seems there, th Audacity, execution, authority, oomph, heft, humor the most enjoyable, truly enlightened, contemporary novel originally written in the English language I ve read in a long, long time I read some of the author s first novel after it came out back when I lived in Brooklyn and a friend recommended it but I didn t make my way too far through it, thinking it too derivative of Ishmael Reed, whose Flight to Canada and Mumbo Jumbo I read in college and loved Now, the influence still seems there, the hyperbolic po mo humor, at times like Mark Leyner walking the satirical high wire of serious sociological significance, but the overall world of the novel, delineated by Dickens LA with a DC frame, plus the wholly characterized characters and the inside jokes and the little pokes at Dave Eggers, Bret Easton Ellis, and the like, the obscure side references loaded up in the last slot of a sentence s comic series, the clarity of every sentence and paragraph and the macro level audacity, the old fashioned yet not at all sentimental father son story, I feel like it s safe to say that he s successfully integrated the Ishmael Reed, who s name checked at one point, and individuated Reading this every day on the Philly subway, wondering what the primarily black passengers think of this white guy reading a book with lawn jockeys on the cover, and wondering so what someone might think when they read over my shoulder, was probably one of the best possible places to read this, especially when the story gave way to rascism related essayistic stretches Nothing is necessarily unknown that he says but the total package delivered with such humor, energy, authentic intelligence no Wittgenstein quotations , with such alacrity and pizzazz as an old prep school football coach I had used to say about how we should execute drills , with insider info on the LA surf scene to boot and references to Sun Ra and Lee Morgan, and Adam Youch I guess, the total package hangs together so well and articulates the complexity of everything in the most effective possible way The writing, the language, always guns it, veering around corners to find unexpected obstacles it blows right through one of the most exciting, refreshing, funny novels I ve read, as soon as I m done writing this I ll find a home for it on the bookshelf I reserve for major favorites flag 39 likesLike see review View all 4 comments Dec 16, 2016 Bil rated it really liked it review of another edition Shelves fiction, humor, favorites, adult, man booker prize Challenging and witty, the Sellout draws its readers into an extensive but unexpectedly entertaining stand up A satire of its own.A black man brings back slavery and racial segregation in a post racial country I found it difficult to finish the novel quicker even if it is just about three hundred pages thick It is not your finish in one night kind of book I had to read it in a span of four days to grasp every thought in every page.The narration pushes me in deep with its snarky and relatab Challenging and witty, the Sellout draws its readers into an extensive but unexpectedly entertaining stand up A satire of its own.A black man brings back slavery and racial segregation in a post racial country I found it difficult to finish the novel quicker even if it is just about three hundred pages thick It is not your finish in one night kind of book I had to read it in a span of four days to grasp every thought in every page.The narration pushes me in deep with its snarky and relatable passages but it pulls me right back out with its tedious references I would recommend that you have your handy search engine right beside you as you read this If you are like me, you would not understand all the references right away in Beatty s award winner but that did not stop me from enjoying it.Paul Beatty reminds us of a harsh truth but in a comical way This chef d oeuvre is deserving of its merits I will definitely read it again flag 34 likesLike see review View all 4 comments Nov 20, 2015 Lauren Cecile rated it really liked it Outrageously irreverent, quirky, challenging and profound An amazingly imaginative racial parody flag 35 likesLike see review View 2 comments Nov 26, 2016 PattyMacDotComma rated it it was amazing Shelves arc netgalley read, politics culture social, award win listed, fiction adult, calibre 4.5 While I was mulling this one over, and its satirical suggestion that a kind of apartheid might be the way to address American racism, I was reading J.M Coetzee s book which touches on a similar subject in Africa, Summertime Quite a pair of prize winning books Clever, witty, American but universal satire I started this, got annoyed because I was bored, so I read something else When I came back to it, I started over and enjoyed the ride I just immersed myself in Beatty s unbelievable 4.5 While I was mulling this one over, and its satirical suggestion that a kind of apartheid might be the way to address American racism, I was reading J.M Coetzee s book which touches on a similar subject in Africa, Summertime Quite a pair of prize winning books Clever, witty, American but universal satire I started this, got annoyed because I was bored, so I read something else When I came back to it, I started over and enjoyed the ride I just immersed myself in Beatty s unbelievable story, and while I don t pretend I got it all, I did grow up in the States, so I may have recognised some of the references that other Booker Prize readers say they didn t.But it doesn t matter, because I don t think it s limited to the American experience You don t need to know all the language references That s kind of the point The cultures are varied I heard Beatty say in an interview that he used to want a book that included all the cultures but now he realises we just need a bigger shelf to encompass all the stories He s hoping this will be one of them.This is about targets Not only America has targets You know them the newest newcomers, generally of a different colour from those who consider themselves the mainstream The same is true of livestock and pecking orders The weakest is bullied literally, in a mob of bulls, if you ve ever seen the poor, dung covered runt while chooks will peck some miserable creature to death In horses, and I think the same is true of migrants, the last one introduced to the paddock seems to be ostracised until a new one comes in Then the newcomer is ostracised and the previous outcast is accepted Colour does sometimes come into it with animals as well as people, and people aren t as accepting, either, but I digress.OK here s Dickens, California, formerly rural, soon to be suburbia The story opens with Bonbon, our black tour guide, currently sitting precariously in the Supreme Court on charges of racism Well, he has a slave, so that s understandable He s uncomfortable, not about the slave, but about how to appear cool and smart yet respectful, but he ends up in the popular school bully I don t give a damn slouch All he needs is a cigarette hanging from his lips between the handcuffs and the slipperiness of this chair s leather upholstery, the only way I can keep from spilling my ass ignominiously onto the goddamn floor is to lean back until I m reclined at an angle just short of detention room nonchalance, but definitely well past courtroom contempt But that s not Bonbon, not in the slightest He s a sensitive boy brought up by a sociologist father, who decides to toughen up his son to face the harsh world of prejudice You know, like the boy in the Johnny Cash song, A Boy Named Sue , except, this isn t in name only In the process, Dad nearly kills his son No, that s not right He makes the boy nearly kill himself by plugging him into electrodes, telling him to look in the mirror and shock the boy in the mirror when he gets an answer wrong Then Dad asks impossible questions and Bonbon zaps himself senseless Dad beats the boy to show him the mindset he will be up against police, guards, who knows what Dad s thinking Dissociative reaction is like a psychic circuit breaker When the mind experiences a power surge of stress and bullshit, it switches off, just shuts your cognition down and you blank out You act but are unaware of your actions So you see, even though I don t remember dislocating your jaw See that last line Mercifully for us and Bonbon, Dad is shot dead by police, and with the compensation money, Bonbon buys up a tract of land in Dickens to recreate the rural scene It s a poor area outside of Los Angeles, but the name is erased from maps and from memories to make way for suburbia, and Bonbon is determined to rectify this People should know where they belong.Then there s, Hominy, an old, addle brained black man, last of the Our Gang child actors, who lives in his glory day memories of film fame Of course, he was the token black Sambo, monkey, butt of all jokes that involved covering him with flour and anything white, like reverse blackface Hominy is like the women usually women who justify staying with abusive boyfriends by saying At least he chose me over everybody else At least Hominy felt like part of the Gang.He insists he s a slave, calls Bonbon Massa , and what s , wants to be whipped true freedom is having the right to be a slave He hiked up his pants and slipped into his Metro Goldwyn Mayer plantationese I know taint nobody forcin me, but dis here one slave you ain t never gwine be rid of Freedom can kiss my postbellum black ass Rather than Freedom or anyone kissing it, Bonbon finds an accommodating SM brothel to meet Hominy s weekly request to whip it Meanwhile, Bonbon grows such stupendous fruit and vegetables that the neighbourhood children sit under his trees to escape the stink everywhere else And he feeds the multitude and tries to put Dickens back on the map by putting up his own road signs.Agreeing to Hominy s slavery and watching the neighbourhood change, he decides the key to harmony is segregation People are comfortable when they know their place It may be satire, but it bites for real Bonbon thinks I understand now that the only time black people don t feel guilty is when we ve actually done something wrong, because that relieves us of the cognitive dissonance of being black and innocent, and in a way the prospect of going to jail becomes a relief I said universal, because I recently read The Last Time We Spoke by Fiona Sussman, from South Africa but now a New Zealander about a Maori boy who feels much like this when he ends up in prison, recognising his destiny he assumes We are losing generations of kids everywhere people need a belonging place Bonbon s joke of the Whites Only sign on a bus, ends up making the passengers surprisingly content I said it was satire.Bonbon wonders Growing up, I used to think all of black America s problems could be solved if we only had a motto A pithy Libert , egalit , fraternit simple, yet profound Noble, and yet somehow egalitarian A calling card for an entire race that was raceless on the surface, but quietly understood by those in the know to be very, very black. Other ethnicities have mottos Unconquered and unconquerable is the calling card of the Chickasaw nation There are some wonderful characters and absurd situations, and Bonbon tries his darndest to meet everybody s needs and expectations.An impossible task, but fun to read about.The quotations are from my NetGalley review copy, so may be different in the final publication flag 34 likesLike see review View 2 comments Aug 19, 2016 Ravi Gangwani rated it really liked it Shelves booker winner, booker 2016, united states, too heavy content, comedy Edit on 28 Oct 2016 The bold letters below were addition of my emotional impulse when this book won and my favorite book lost, all on nature of my childish behavior you can see all the brief history of four edits below Well earlier I gave this 4 Star because I really enjoyed some of its sections and later changed it to one when this book won Booker but than I thought it is very unfair to discard something that I have already given just because of going crazy as lunatic sports fan whose Edit on 28 Oct 2016 The bold letters below were addition of my emotional impulse when this book won and my favorite book lost, all on nature of my childish behavior you can see all the brief history of four edits below Well earlier I gave this 4 Star because I really enjoyed some of its sections and later changed it to one when this book won Booker but than I thought it is very unfair to discard something that I have already given just because of going crazy as lunatic sports fan whose favorite team lost So I am amending it again and this last time and I am done with this and I promised myself I will not touch it again just restoring it s earlier ratings just to get absolve my mood, not than that Edit on 25 Oct 2016 WORST DECISION IN THE HISTORY OF MAN BOOKER AND A BIG FUCK OFF TO THIS YEAR S LIST I AM REALLY FRUSTRATED AND WILL NOT READ MAN BOOKER SHORTLIST NEXT YEARI AM TRUNCATING MY RATINGS FOR THIS SHITTY BOOK FROM FOUR TO ONE THIS IS IN PROTEST I really wished Do not say we have nothing to win.I am sad till terrible extent.Edit on 15 Sep 2016 I really don t want this book to win but I have inner feeling this might race through due to it s quirky nature Why at the same time I liked as well disliked this, read the story below Review written on 26th August 2016 Once upon a time, a black Afro American revolutionary Overintellectual, named Paul Beatty, mistakenly found one encyclopedia of History and Geography of Racism , black covered, and he started writing all the black references mentioned in it And a black idea suddenly gurgled in him He applied then the black chutney of poetry that he might have written in past, and later 0.1% energy of his brain he appropriated on developing some unbelievable story.It cooked a black dish in white cover as The Sellout Thus, last night there was fight in a home that I call my body, strong fight between HANDS and BRAIN Full 5 Stars, Brain was begging Please, please, pleeeeeeeeeesse Have you gone nuts not then 2, you fucking shit understand, this was senseless, sensible, useless human shit, Do I call Rosa Park, no baby she might swell in tears if she had read it It was all fluff accumulated No no nouuuu I was fucking tired of Googling references due to your satisfaction hands refuted the appeal of brain.And in this rife, pages of my book became the victim as torn out in the war of underlines Not than 2, Hands 5, Brain.Order Order The court case settled due to my colored Indian background taking a median route Final Verdict 4 Heart gave 0.5 star of charity But my lord I do have serious question to Americans, is it racism still trailing there so that Paul Beatty gone so paranoid and wrote this hysterical cursing loudspeaker blurting of the cries of nigger souls Nearly 25% book went over my head, but at some places it was seriously very funny I still have no idea why I am giving FOUR STARS to this shitty hilarious novel Whatever it is I enjoyed last 150 pages and some beautiful quotes Silence can be either protest or consent but sometimes it is also is fear Sometimes it is nihilism that makes life worthy It just feels some highly scorched black version of The brief history of seven killings of last year But that one had power, emotions and plot in its pocket And this one was completely devoid of real plot.I don t know and really don t care if it wins Booker 2016 It can win I have some doubts because sometimes Booker also walk on zigzag quirky path 26 Aug 2016 review ended Continue 28 Oct s review It won as I said the doubts.Unfortunate Man Booker 2016 Winner flag 32 likesLike see review View all 25 comments Nov 07, 2016 Tristan rated it liked it review of another edition DISCLAIMER THE FOLLOWING TEXT IS THE EMBARRASSING RESULT OF YET ANOTHER WHITE ASS FOOL CULTURALLY APPROPRIATING THE BLACK MAN S RAP GAME Dig this drop that beat Yo, yo Now, don t get me wrongThis brutha s prose is the damn near illest, speedin by like an antelope on pure ass crack hunted down by lions, that s nature s SEAL team of killersIt s cracklin and crackin , out of sight, like a symphonic orchestra of Thor hammerblows to a Cyclops cataract eye on a stormy winter nightThis nigga i DISCLAIMER THE FOLLOWING TEXT IS THE EMBARRASSING RESULT OF YET ANOTHER WHITE ASS FOOL CULTURALLY APPROPRIATING THE BLACK MAN S RAP GAME Dig this drop that beat Yo, yo Now, don t get me wrongThis brutha s prose is the damn near illest, speedin by like an antelope on pure ass crack hunted down by lions, that s nature s SEAL team of killersIt s cracklin and crackin , out of sight, like a symphonic orchestra of Thor hammerblows to a Cyclops cataract eye on a stormy winter nightThis nigga is spittin his sizzlin rhymes rhapsodic like there s no tomorrow We have here some heavy shit he s puttin out, yet cleverly veiled in satire, so, if needed, he has an out, he has no need for bein entangled in a screwed up media quagmireThat cool fo sho, I don t complain, mucho respect, I m feelin his flow, his wantin to go clean and straight for the neck But man, what a bombastic drag it becomes after a page or hundred fifty, this cat isn t he a f ckin poet in his creative writing classes should have learned about bein pithyHell yes, I know it s a novel, but he could have at least bothered to craft a substantive, emotionally investing story, then he would have had somethin , approachin bein pretty bitchin peremptoryAlas, the result has its merit, has a certain aplomb, tis a fine thing indeed, but not as was advertised quite the thermonuclear bombMy main man Booker properly British had never before granted his much sought after gift to one of those American..gitsSo we all knew it was bound to happen, why not now, it s a topical theme, plus as an added bonus, they unanimously seemed to be a fan, so crownin him the undisputed champion wasn t too wack a planYeah, it s probably meBeing hyper contrarian when it comes to literary prizes and current hypes,You see, me, if the subject is deserving, I m not at all above making cantankerous snipesThus am I, this is how I rollHomies, I implore you and your itchy trigger fingers , keep those uzi s holstered, this is not an all out diss, this metaphorical blunt initially did leave me reelin , feelin pleasantly high,Yet, after further contemplation of the kind analytical, realising it was all rather superficial, I caught myself lettin escape a slightly disappointed sighPeace. flag 33 likesLike see review View 1 comment Mar 31, 2016 Katerina rated it liked it Shelves american lit, supposed to be funny, booker, true colors, , , 2016_read OMG, I actually have finished this book Where s my prize cookie No, make it two Two boxes of cookies Brief outline 1 There is racism in America 2 White people don t know shit about racism.3 Black people make super cool racism jokes 4 About 400 pages of cool racism jokes 5 Which are actually kinda sad 6 Racism is sad 7 Stop judging people by their skin color 8 Stop comparing black skin color to food chocolate black , coffee black , mocha black , etc, if you don t want to be OMG, I actually have finished this book Where s my prize cookie No, make it two Two boxes of cookies Brief outline 1 There is racism in America 2 White people don t know shit about racism.3 Black people make super cool racism jokes 4 About 400 pages of cool racism jokes 5 Which are actually kinda sad 6 Racism is sad 7 Stop judging people by their skin color 8 Stop comparing black skin color to food chocolate black , coffee black , mocha black , etc, if you don t want to be vanilla white , eggshell white etc 9 Black people can do stream of consciousness and longish academic words 10 It s called fucking stand up comedy Jesus, , Christ on crunches , Meh , flag 32 likesLike see review View all 11 comments Jan 15, 2017 Kyriakos Sorokkou rated it it was ok review of another edition for me it didn t work.I don t know from where to start All the overly culture specific references it included, from African American history to Pop Culture were passing over my head Now I ll switch into Greek in order to rant in my mummy tongue , Man Booker 2016 Man Booker Man Booker Prize for me it didn t work.I don t know from where to start All the overly culture specific references it included, from African American history to Pop Culture were passing over my head Now I ll switch into Greek in order to rant in my mummy tongue , Man Booker 2016 Man Booker Man Booker Prize , , , , , , , goodreads There is also the non uncommon issue for non American readers of unexplained cultural references on the assumption that American culture is universal which again is exactly the problem. , nigger , , , , , 100% , , , , , , , , 65% , It was all over the place , 289 100 3 , , nigger , , , nigger , , nigger 2 nigger , , , , , 5 5 , , , , 10 IQ , 5 10 flag 30 likesLike see review View all 18 comments Dec 12, 2016 Dannii Elle rated it really liked it review of another edition Shelves literary fiction love How does one even begin to write a review on the Man Booker prize winner This is a witty and scathing satire, primarily concerned with skin colour and the prejudices towards it It s boldness in confronting these issues is commendable and the brashness it does so with, makes this an often disquieting read Yet a necessary one The subject matter is complex, as is the story, and also my opinions towards it.I did not understand every cultural reference and some parts were so logically and politic How does one even begin to write a review on the Man Booker prize winner This is a witty and scathing satire, primarily concerned with skin colour and the prejudices towards it It s boldness in confronting these issues is commendable and the brashness it does so with, makes this an often disquieting read Yet a necessary one The subject matter is complex, as is the story, and also my opinions towards it.I did not understand every cultural reference and some parts were so logically and politically dense as to lose me entirely Yet neither of these put me off my enjoyment of this and only served to make me strive to learn on the topics broached This withering political criticism and social commentary is well deserving of the accolade it has already garnered The unabashed approach it takes makes the reader stand to attention and makes this a powerful and commendable written caricature of society flag 29 likesLike see review View 2 comments Feb 26, 2017 Nnenna rated it really liked it Get ready to go for a wild ride when you read this book It s irreverent and incisive from the first few pages and it doesn t really slow down The narrator, whose first name we never learn, is a black man living in Dickens, California He describes Dickens as the original ghetto and is distressed when Dickens is literally erased from the map The narrator comes up with a plan to get Dickens noticed and put it back on the map bring back segregation.This novel is as wacky as that plot descriptio Get ready to go for a wild ride when you read this book It s irreverent and incisive from the first few pages and it doesn t really slow down The narrator, whose first name we never learn, is a black man living in Dickens, California He describes Dickens as the original ghetto and is distressed when Dickens is literally erased from the map The narrator comes up with a plan to get Dickens noticed and put it back on the map bring back segregation.This novel is as wacky as that plot description sounds and it s a satire on race relations in America Beatty is not afraid to go there, and several times I was wincing at his accurate observations about race The plot can be unbelievable, until you remind yourself of the current political climate There s a lot of truth in this book and a lot to digest It s certainly left me reevaluating and taking a hard look at the current state of affairs.I m really glad I got around to this one in February As with all of my Black History Month reads, this story feels even timely and necessary than ever flag 37 likesLike see review View 1 comment Sep 13, 2016 Bookbeaver rated it did not like it I certainly credit Beatty for letting the world know how bad racism is in our post racism society, but 50 or so pages of this rant was all I could take I was looking forward to the comic novel this has been praised as being, but unfortunately I found it to be trite and tiresome Literary humor should sneak up and surprise you, even when you know it s coming, not continuously attempt to hit you over your head with itself I understand this is a minority opinion, but it s mine and I ll stick I certainly credit Beatty for letting the world know how bad racism is in our post racism society, but 50 or so pages of this rant was all I could take I was looking forward to the comic novel this has been praised as being, but unfortunately I found it to be trite and tiresome Literary humor should sneak up and surprise you, even when you know it s coming, not continuously attempt to hit you over your head with itself I understand this is a minority opinion, but it s mine and I ll stick by it The fact this novel won this year s Tournament of Books only furthers my growing dissatisfaction with that event as well Again, my opinion, and one that I can mostly assume is built on my getting older seemingly every year and narrowing my appreciation to literary novels that celebrate the art of writing rather than doing nothing than ringing the bell of popular culture, even if well intentioned Don t not attempt to read this book based on this, just know I, for one, didn t care for it flag 26 likesLike see review View all 6 comments Mar 10, 2015 Scott Rhee rated it it was amazing Shelves humor, black humor, black studies, slavery, satire Comedian Dave Chappelle would regale viewers of his now classic TV sketch comedy show with skits that blurred the lines between brilliant social commentary and what some called reverse racism I don t believe in reverse racism I think its a stupid term made up by idiotic white people who can t or won t understand the hypocrisy behind criticizing black people who have the gall to make fun of white people In truth, Chappelle was making fun of black people, too His brilliance was that, in hi Comedian Dave Chappelle would regale viewers of his now classic TV sketch comedy show with skits that blurred the lines between brilliant social commentary and what some called reverse racism I don t believe in reverse racism I think its a stupid term made up by idiotic white people who can t or won t understand the hypocrisy behind criticizing black people who have the gall to make fun of white people In truth, Chappelle was making fun of black people, too His brilliance was that, in his most vitriolic and satirical skits, his non black viewers who didn t get it laughed along with the jokes about black people, not realizing that Chappelle was commenting on the racist ways white people still viewed blacks Non black viewers who got it knew that the joke was ultimately on them.Paul Beatty, in his new novel The Sellout , is doing the same kind of thing that Chappelle was doing in his sketch and stand up comedy Beatty s brilliance is that he is a gifted satirical writer who, at his best, evokes Jonathon Swift, Charles Dickens, Mark Twain, and Kurt Vonnegut Beatty also evokes the brilliance of fellow black comedians Dick Gregory, Richard Pryor, and Chappelle I m sure there will be many critics who lambaste Beatty s novel for being offensive and racist , labels which I m pretty sure have been leveled at all the afore mentioned authors and comedians While, certainly, some of Beatty s book is offensive in a good way , it is definitely not racist It is simply pointing out the insidious, and absurd, nature of a subtle racism in a 21st century post racial United States The fact that some people actually believe that we live in a post racial or post racist society is proof positive of this subtle racism.The protagonist of The Sellout is a young black man named Me, who grew up in an agrarian community in southern Los Angeles known as Dickens He lived with his single father, a noted black social scientist, who used his son as a guinea pig and torture victim of his numerous social experiments, until being gunned down in broad daylight in front of his son by two white police officers for insulting them Of course, neither officers were ever put on trial for unjustifiable homicide Needless to say, Me did not have a happy childhood He was, however, exposed to a much wider intellectual world than his public school peers Me was home schooled Having read Freud, Jung, Ralph Ellison, and W.E.B Dubois probably before ever learning to ride a bike, Me grew up to be a brilliant, if not socially awkward and isolated, young man.When the city of Dickens nothing than a 10 block section of farms and ghetto housing is threatened to be incorporated by Los Angeles, Me struggles to find a way to keep his beloved hometown on the map, literally He finds it in an improbable but strangely brilliant solution bringing back segregation Dickens, already an all black with the exception of a sizable Latino group and a handful of Asians community, was a place that white people avoided and ignored anyway Basing his decision on findings that showed that children segregated by race actually fared better on standardized tests, graduation rates, and employment rates, Me makes Dickens a completely white free town Almost overnight, the town regains a spark of life Businesses start thriving Kids start doing better in the public schools.Of course, Me does not ingratiate himself with the whites in charge The topper is the fact that Me has a slave In truth, it s just ol Hominy Jenkins, a former child actor he had bit parts in The Little Rascals and was the go to kid anytime a movie needed a cute slave boy who does odd jobs for Me and calls him Massa ever since Me saved him from a suicide attempt Me never asked him to be his slave, Hominy just took it upon himself In any case, the city of L.A charges him with slavery, and now his case is in the U.S Supreme Court.Along the way, Me rekindles a relationship with his childhood sweetheart, learns the fine points of nigger whispering , and pisses off black conservatives like Bill Cosby and Condoleeza Rice All in the name of unintentionally selling out his race.Between the laughs and there are plenty in this book , there are also parts that are thought provoking and disturbing Clearly, Beatty is not promoting a resurgence of segregation or even slavery That s ridiculous He is, however, using the ridiculousness of those two concepts as a way to point out the absurdity of our own 21st century society, a society that is still regardless of what Ann Coulter and everyone on FOX News wants us to believe reeling negatively from the effects of 300 years of slavery in this country and a racism that may not be reflected in blatant white supremacist Jim Crow laws but still lies below the surface to occasionally resurface, disguised by smiling white politicians, police officers, and pundits flag 25 likesLike see review View 2 comments Jan 15, 2017 Vanessa rated it liked it review of another edition The Sellout by Paul Beatty was a very different read for me, and something definitely outwith my comfort zone I don t typically read satire, as I often feel like a lot of the humour within satire requires prior knowledge to many subjects that I am not well versed in The same can be said for my experience reading this book, but I am still very glad I made the time to read this, and I can see why this was the winning book of the Man Booker Prize in 2016.The book follows an unnamed narrator, occa The Sellout by Paul Beatty was a very different read for me, and something definitely outwith my comfort zone I don t typically read satire, as I often feel like a lot of the humour within satire requires prior knowledge to many subjects that I am not well versed in The same can be said for my experience reading this book, but I am still very glad I made the time to read this, and I can see why this was the winning book of the Man Booker Prize in 2016.The book follows an unnamed narrator, occasionally known to others as Bonbon, who lives in the small community of Dickens on the outskirts of L.A working as a farmer who specializes in artisanal fruit and weed His childhood was spent being home schooled by his father and subjected to his racially charged psychological studies In his adult life, Dickens has been wiped off the Californian map, and so in an attempt to save it he attempts to reinstate slavery and segregate a local high school It is a crazy and emotionally charged premise, and Beatty communicates the story with a great deal of dark humour and linguistic prowess.This book is definitely by no means a casual read, one you can just speed through in a few days and enjoy on a shallow level Beatty has a biting wit that is often very funny, but at times I felt like I really did not appreciate or understand everything that he was trying to communicate Not only am I not African American, but I m not even American, and I felt like a lot of the political and cultural references went completely over my head I had to really concentrate on what I was reading, and it did take me a while to get used to the narrative voice as well However, I found myself really becoming absorbed in the novel in the middle section, when the narrator begins to make steps to bringing back Dickens.Beatty is clearly an accomplished author He makes use of clever word play, injects Latin phrases throughout, and displays a subtle wit that is genuinely enjoyable to read One character s rewrites of classic American novels such as Huckleberry Finn and The Great Gatsby were genuinely hilarious to read, and I felt in tune with the novel at those points as I had a knowledge of the literature they were altering.Overall this is a really interesting book, with a really fascinating premise that at times can be uncomfortable to read about, but is most definitely important to read about Definitely worth a read, and definitely Man Booker worthy, even if it wasn t entirely my thing flag 25 likesLike see review Oct 31, 2016 BlackOxford rated it it was amazing Shelves favorites, american fiction Creating HistoryWhatever your conscious attitude toward race, and whatever your race, your self image will be shaken by Paul Beatty s work And whatever criticism that could be offered about the work has already been addressed within it To coin a phrase this changes everything It cuts through everybody s bunk white people s, black people s, sociologists , politicians , journalists , not forgetting novelists major bunk lode Beatty s point is clear the world of race in America is a lot mor Creating HistoryWhatever your conscious attitude toward race, and whatever your race, your self image will be shaken by Paul Beatty s work And whatever criticism that could be offered about the work has already been addressed within it To coin a phrase this changes everything It cuts through everybody s bunk white people s, black people s, sociologists , politicians , journalists , not forgetting novelists major bunk lode Beatty s point is clear the world of race in America is a lot complex than can be expressed by anyone involved in it In comparison, quantum physics is kindergarten stuff By exposing just about every academic and cultural shibboleth available in this tragi comic masterpiece, Beatty clears the deck for something else For my money that something else might well be grounded in just one of his prescient observations, history isn t the paper it s printed on It s memory, and memory is time, emotions, and song History is the things that stay with you As far as I am concerned, Beatty has created history flag 25 likesLike see review View all 10 comments previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next new topicDiscuss This Book topics posts views last activity The Filipino Group F2F65 May 2017 2016 Award Winners The Sellout by Paul Beatty 18 55 May 26, 2017 08 12AM What is your takeaway from The Sellout 3 84 May 23, 2017 10 26PM The Mookse and th 2016 Winner The Sellout 100 149 Mar 15, 2017 03 12PM More topics Recommend It Stats Recent Status Updates Readers Also Enjoyed.



The Sellout Reviews

The Sellout
Jessica Woodbury

If Kurt Vonnegut and Dave Chappelle had a baby and really messed with its head, it would write this novel I hope Paul Beatty takes that as a compliment because it s meant that way.This is some seriously biting satire You know it right away, since it begins with the main character, a black man, before the Supreme Court because he s charged with keeping a slave Most of the novel is a flashback, showing us how the protagonist not only kept a slave but attempted to re segregate his formerly all b

The Sellout
Glenn Sumi

Paul Beatty s novel is a savage satire about a post racial America, and it points out how absurd that notion really is.The black narrator, Bonbon, grew up in a disappeared L.A suburb once an agrarian ghetto, called Dickens where he was subjected to his father s sociological experiments about race.After his father is accidentally killed by the LAPD see This is some serious shit , he wants to reintroduce slavery and, gradually, segregation, first in buses and then in a school ditto

The Sellout
Steve

As an urban commuter I felt that pulling a book out with lawn jockeys on the cover should come with a disclaimer Hey everybody, it s meant to be you know ironic It s written by a black guy it s satire And just so you know, my iPhone doesn t have one word of Breitbart News on it.Satires, to me, are like hoppy craft beers The natural skew to the bitter side should be balanced out for optimal flavor Paul Beatty s deft touch with a joke made the astringency you d expect from charges of rac

The Sellout
Hugh

Satire is a difficult genre to assess and review, particularly when it is so tightly bound to a culture one does not share On the positive side, this book is often very funny, and is full of ideas and snipes at deserving targets Over the length of a novel, though, the tone is somewhat relentless, and the story does not seem to have enough weight to sustain the interest it seems like a series of set pieces Not a book to read if you are easily offended either, but the issues Beatty addre

The Sellout
Trish

when I did what I did, I wasn t thinking about inalienable rights, the proud history of our people I did what worked, and since when did a little slavery and segregation ever hurt anybody, and if so, so fucking be it My copy of this novel is spiked with tabs marking something deeply insightful, stabbingly funny, or needing revisiting There is simply too much to point to Beatty must have been saving up observations about race relations in America to get so much into this relatively short no

The Sellout
Jibran

Subtitle A mini dictionary of the oddities and eccentricities of Black America mixed in with a bevy of pop culture obscurities interspersed with some brilliant flashes of satire by Paul Beatty.For the sake modesty, let me say that I m in two minds whether the special outweighs the ordinary and vice versa But there s no doubt that the book is designed as a commercial product for timely consumption given the rise in racial tensions in the US in the last few years But this alone has never been a

The Sellout
John Pappas

Imagine Nina Simone singing Mississippi Goddam reincarnated as an atomic bomb thatexplodes high enough for all of America to see, while Mark Twain chuckles and says I told ya so, from the relative safety of a bunker deep in the canon of American literature That s nowhere near how incendiary, biting, acerbic, witty, smart, funny, explosive, hard hitting and revelatory Beatty s satire is The first 50 pages had me wondering if he could sustain this voice, this force for another pagethe nex

The Sellout
Joachim Stoop

I don t recall reading a book which I loved so much in the beginning and was soooo fed up with in the end It s too much of too much There are about zero normal sentences and that was very tiring It reminded me of Steve Toltz Quicksand I couldn t keep up with avalanches and avalanches of wit satire It s a damn shame, cuz I laughed out loud the first chapters.I also think the book is better for native speakers lots of linguistic humor and if you live in the States lots of inside jo

The Sellout
Claire Wolff

One star for creativity, another for brilliant, innovative, hysterical prose, and a third for waking America up with a slap upside our post racial national head Every sentence in this novel is a combination of Um, YES, that is so true and I can t believe I ve never thought of it that way before Minus a star for lack of compelling plot Beatty gets so lost in his ridiculous subplots that I stopped caring what happened next Will Dickens be saved from obsolescence Will the Dum Dum Intell

The Sellout
Peter Boyle

This may be hard to believe, coming from a black man, but I ve never stolen anything So begins the first page in this scathing satire of race in America Our narrator is up before the Supreme Court, charged with attempting to reinstate slavery and segregation in his hometown of Dickens, a rundown neighborhood of Los Angeles His accomplices are Hominy Jenkins, a former child star of the Little Rascals, and Marpessa Dawson, a foul mouthed bus driver and the object of our hero s affections But

thumbnail Title: The Sellout
Author:Paul Beatty
ISBN :0374260508
ranting: 1.5
Reviewer: 4380 Reviews
Description: Paul Beatty s The Sellout showcases a comic genius at the top of his game A biting satire about a young man s isolated upbringing and the race trial that sends him to the Supreme Court, it chal

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